Friday, April 20, 2018

The Narrative Paintings of Thomas Cole



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The Narrative Paintings of Thomas Cole
// Voyages Extraordinaires

In the decades prior to the creation of film, the unveiling of large-scale paintings took the place of mass entertainment media events. Landscape subjects were the most popular, so when someone like Frederic Edwin Church premiered a new painting of South America, it was with the requisite fanfare in salons fully bedecked in potted palms, velvet drapes, complimentary artifacts, live musical
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Some Neat Album Covers From Movies & Tv Shows (1956 - 1987)



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Some Neat Album Covers From Movies & Tv Shows (1956 - 1987)
// 13

The original concept of this blog was to be 'music from the monster movies,' so I think it's about time I showed you some of the record soundtrack album covers to go along with some of those movies! Welcome to The Dungeon! Up first from 1956, is the wild electronic soundtrack by Louis and Bebe Barron for one of the best movies of all time, "Forbidden Planet." As cool and ahead of it's time as this music was, it's still hard for me to imagine anybody taking this record home and listening to it over and over. It was perfect for the movie, but it's just not that kind of music!

I was going to strictly do records from movies we've written about here, but I'm making the exception for these two "Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer" records, just because it's Mickey Spillane we're talking about here, not some ordinary chump!!

 "The 7th Voyage Of Sinbad" from 1958 had a magnificent score by Bernard Herrmann!

"I Married A Monster From Outer Space" came out in 1958, but this 'soundtrack' CD wasn't released until 2012. I still included it here since it's one of our favourite movies!

This LP was a 1964 release of music from the TV series "Burke's Law." The double entendre here is that the composer's name was Herschel Burke Gilbert. Tricky, right?

Piero Umiliani was a gifted composer we have featured here many times, and I'm sure this 1965 album for the movie "Operazione Poker" is a swingin' affair! Five aces in the deck, you gotta love it!

"The Satan Bug" came out in 1965, but this hard to find CD by Jerry Goldsmith wasn't released until 2007.

This fantastic record of music by Peter Thomas for the German Space Patrol, "Raumpatrouille" was released in 1966. I'm pretty sure that autographed CD's can still be purchased from BSC Music for a very reasonable price.

This seven inch 45 from 1966 by Nelson Riddle featured the "Batman Theme" written by Neal Hefti from the "Batman" TV series, and the flip side was another composer play on words, called "Nelson's Riddler!"

In 1967 "Bedazzled" came out, and this soundtrack LP came out the following year. Most of the music for the movie was composed by Dudley Moore himself. What a talented guy he was!

This is the cover for a 2016 vinyl LP they released of the 1967 film "Mad Monster Party" featuring music composed by Maury Lewis and Jules Bass, with some spoken word from Boris Karloff, and the title song sung by Ethel Ennis as can be heard right here!

This 1968 soundtrack from "Danger: Diabolik" is composed by Maestro Ennio Morricone and features the awesome song "Deep Down."

The prolific Bruno Nicolai is another Italian composer we've featured on these pages a number of times! This 1972 LP featured the music from the film "All The Colors Of The Dark!"

This CD for the 1973 film "The Satanic Rites Of Dracula" composed by John Cacavas, came back from the dead in 2011.

Sun Ra and his amazing Intergalactic Solar Arkestra came out with this movie and record called "Space Is The Place" in 1974, and is a must-see for any true fan of music!

"Suspiria" from 1977 is a Dario Argento movie we haven't got around to yet, but I wanted to include this cover just because I like the "Creepers" band called Goblin!

"The Monster Club" came out in 1981, with this very fun and listenable soundtrack featuring B.A. Robertson, The Viewers, Night, UB-40, Expressos. The Pretty Things, John Williams with the Douglas Gamely Orchestra, John Georgiadis, and Alan Hawkshaw!

Last but not least comes "Evil Dead II" from 1987, and music from Joseph Lo Duca!
Pretty Crazy, huh?

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FROM BEYOND / Everything Is Alive... And Hungry! - 1986



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FROM BEYOND / Everything Is Alive... And Hungry! - 1986
// 13

Here's another H. P. Lovecraft story from the RE-ANIMATOR gang, this time, a group of scientists have developed a machine called The Resonator, it allows whoever is within its range to see beyond normal perceptible reality. But, when the experiment succeeds, they are immediately attacked by creepy, biting life forms!

It stars Jeffrey (THE MAN WITH TWO BRAINS) Combs, Barbara (ROBOT WARS) Crampton, Ted (BASKET CASE 2) Sorel and Ken (DAWN OF THE DEAD) Foree. I actually saw this one when it came out...

After a deadly accident with the Resonator, Crawford Tillinghast (Combs), Dr. Katherine Mc Michaels (Crampton) and Bubba Brownlee (Foree) return to the house where the Resonator is located... Then, they turn it on!

Besides a feeling of euphoria they have, some very strange creatures appear and attack Bubba!

Then, Dr. Edward Pretorius (Sorel), who was killed in the original accident, appears and changes into a slobbering monster. He takes a liking to the female, Dr. Mc Michaels!

Even with the machine off, its influence takes over Mc Michaels sensations. So, what else, she starts feeling super sexy and shocks Bubba when he walks in on her trying to put the make on the damaged Tillinghast.

The machine can come on at any time and if you try to turn it off, well, it shocks the Hell out of you!! A maggot swarm demolishes big Bubba, some sick shit going on around here, man!

Dr. Pretorius has a new trick up his.. err.. you know. Anyway, a weird eyeball pops out of his head. It's a cool psychedelic way of seeing things!..

Instead of seeing this...

You see it like this!.. Far out!

Tillinghast then gets his extra eye! By this time, him and Mc Michaels are out of the house, both undergoing therapy! Later, he feasts on his nurse's eye socket for the halibut!..

Don't ax me, they jus' be crazy!!

Okay, back at the ranch... It's time to rumble, Tillinghast and Pretorius fight it out, but hey, monsters generally beat the crap out of puny humans!

Mc Michaels is feverishly trying to destroy the Resonator but's always in constant danger.

Pretorius has gone totally bonkers and only has a few seconds left to exist...

Our heroine was able to rig up a bomb on the machine, we'll end it here, with 13 seconds left on the timer, just before it goes... KA-FUKIN-BLOOWIE!!!!

Well, that's it today, tune in Wednesday where Eegah!! dares you to check out his cargo!

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nevver:Life After People, Joe Nafis

Friday, April 13, 2018

The Overlooked Wonders of Soviet-Era Industrial Design



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The Overlooked Wonders of Soviet-Era Industrial Design
// Atlas Obscura - Latest Articles and Places

From domestic appliances to clothing to children's toys, everyday items from Soviet life are the subject of the new book Designed in the USSR: 1950 - 1989. It's a comprehensive look at a momentous four decades, in which otherwise mundane products often had an additional purpose: to replicate items from the West, or to promote Soviet achievements.

The Saturnas vacuum cleaner did both. Entirely spherical and encircled by a beige-colored ring, it was released in 1962, the year after the cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first human being to travel into outer space. This mini-planet cleared dust from the floor, while its form reminded its user of the USSR's space capabilities. It was also based on an existing American product, Hoover's Constellation vacuum cleaner, which was released in 1955.

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"There were 'sample product rooms,' where Western examples of industrial products were displayed, often serving as prototypes for their Soviet equivalents," writes Alexandra Sankova in the book's introduction. Sankova is the director of the Moscow Design Museum, which first displayed these items in an exhibition in 2012. For her, the Soviet era from the 1950s onwards was an important period of design history, "when function and utility were the driving forces behind ideas but remarkable examples of innovation and creativity still flourished."

Yet in the context of the Soviet system, such creativity was not always celebrated. "There existed a veritable army of professional designers who were mentioned only on pay slips and industrial certificates," writes Sankova. "Instead, manufacturers employed so-called 'artistic engineers' who were responsible for the visual appearance of their products."

Some of the products featured in the book have since become iconic, such as the Nevalyaskha roly-poly dolls that righted themselves to an upright position. Others remained as prototypes, such as the Belka A50 compact car, which had a stub-nosed front and a bubble-shaped roof. And some have enjoyed a second life in post-USSR Russia: cosplayers have been known to use the top half of a Saturnas vacuum cleaner as medieval helmets. Atlas Obscura has a selection of images from the book.

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