Friday, June 23, 2017

Eye Candy for Today: Julian Alden Weir’s The Factory Village



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Eye Candy for Today: Julian Alden Weir's The Factory Village
// lines and colors

The Factory Village,  Julian Alden Weir, American Impressionist painting
The Factory Village, Julian Alden Weir

In the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Use the "Download" or "Enlarge" links under the image on their site.

In this late 19th century scene — that makes factory life seem almost idyllic — I love Weir's textural application of paint and the way he uses it to soften his edges, particularly in the trunk and branches of the tree.

 

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The 3 Cycles of Painting: Freedom, Faith and Healing



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The 3 Cycles of Painting: Freedom, Faith and Healing
// Artist's Network

Best Ways to Paint in Your Studio

3 Cycles of Painting, Acrylic Painting, Nancy Reyner, Painting Process | Artists Network

Energy Field & Water by Nancy Reyner, acrylic on canvas

 

Someone once asked me if I go to my studio every day, or do I wait until I feel creative. This got me thinking about my art-making process. I discovered that I paint using three different cycles: beginning, continuing and completion.

Perhaps this may seem too simple. But by identifying these separate cycles I realized that each one requires a different type of energy, technique and approach. This, in turn, increased my productivity and gave an ease and flow to my studio time. In a nutshell, beginning is about freedom, continuing requires faith and completion is about healing.

I go to my studio almost every day, regardless of how I feel. But when I get to my studio, I start by taking a moment to choose the activity that best pairs with how I feel. Creativity takes on many guises.

Freedom in Beginning

3 Cycles of Painting, Acrylic Painting, Nancy Reyner, Painting Process | Artists Network

 

Sometimes I want to try out new things, have high levels of active energy, want to engage in something playful, or I just want to experiment. I always have lots of extra canvases and surfaces around (even a stack of cardboard will do) and I may launch several to a dozen new paintings in one day. This is my beginning cycle using freedom and play.

 

Faith in Continuing

3 Cycles of Painting, Acrylic Painting, Nancy Reyner, Painting Process | Artists Network

 

Other times I get to my studio feeling overwhelmed with too many paintings in process, or I have a less active, more meditative energy. In this case, I turn all my canvases except one to face the wall so I am not distracted and can focus on one painting at a time.

This "continuing" cycle is often the toughest for me. The work can lose its initial surprise and excitement, or hasn't yet become something cohesive, so I need to trust and have faith that by working on the painting one step at a time, one area at a time, it will start to mature.

Healing in Completion

3 Cycles of Painting, Acrylic Painting, Nancy Reyner, Painting Process | Artists Network

Hidden Rainbow by Nancy Reyner, acrylic on panel

 

Over the course of two months, I will usually spend at least half my studio time starting new work, in the beginning cycle. About a third of my studio time is in the continuing cycle. The remaining amount of time, perhaps only a small percentage focuses on completing work.

Finishing a painting takes a very particular type of energy. On these very valuable and rare days, I can clearly see what each painting needs to make it the best it can be. I will give that last finishing touch to several in one day—finishing them all! Then I go out and celebrate. It's more of a struggle for me to work on one painting, by itself, through all its cycles. Having many choices of paintings to work on simultaneously takes the "attachment" factor out of working on just one. In this way, I can put my energy to its best use.

When I am painting a commission with a deadline for completion, I will paint it all the way through, but I still take occasional breaks to play on some other paintings to keep the juices flowing. I find it easiest to work in one cycle for the whole day, and not switch during that day. For instance, if I spend several hours flinging paint in a freedom engaged session of "starts" I will not be as adept on that same day to try to finish a different painting.

How to 'Create Perfect Paintings'

The clip above on my three cycles of painting is pulled from a video I made which features highlights from my latest book, Create Perfect Paintings.

You can watch the entire presentation at my YouTube Channel, which includes the best ways to bring attention to your painting, extend its viewing time and heighten the viewing experience.

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3 Cycles of Painting, Acrylic Painting, Nancy Reyner, Painting Process | Artists Network

Nancy Reyner

 

From creating costumes and sets for theater and film to coordinating public arts programs for the state of New York, Nancy Reyner has had an extensive career in the arts. She has been painting for more than 30 years, teaching and exhibiting both nationally and internationally.

Learn some of her painting techniques through her video workshops, streaming now at ArtistsNetwork.tv. You can also find her video and book, Create Perfect Paintings, in the North Light Shop. Happy painting, artists!

The post The 3 Cycles of Painting: Freedom, Faith and Healing appeared first on Artist's Network.


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Deciphering Flesh Tones



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Deciphering Flesh Tones
// Muddy Colors

-By Howard Lyon


Color is a fascinating and challenging part of painting.  It can be defined as hue, saturation and value. Today, I am going to focus a little more on saturation. Saturation being how intense or gray a color is.

Before I get going though, I think I need to add a disclaimer to this post. Painting from life is the best way to understand color. Also, photographs of paintings are by no means the same or close to observing a painting in person and only capture a small range of color and value discernible to the eye.


With that out of the way, I do think there are some important things we can learn about color using the computer and photography. Also, photographing paintings for later study can help to reinforce or add to observations made in person. I mention this along with the disclaimer because I am going to use a photograph of a Bouguereau painting to make some observations today.



I have long been fascinated by William Bouguereau's paintings. There are other artists whose work I admire more for their artistry and subject, but I am hard pressed to think of another artist who achieved such a high level of technical skill. He could draw with great accuracy and had a wonderful eye for value and beauty, but for me it was ability to paint skin with very subtle shifts in hue and saturation that draws me in.

When Bouguereau was at his best, the flesh in his paintings looks like there is blood flowing just under the skin, vibrant and alive. You also see so much color. There is no 'flesh color' but many slight changes in hue and saturation that work together to create the impression of flesh.


In an effort to understand color a little better, I came up with a way of examining a photo of one of his paintings. I did this a few years ago and posted it on my site, but I did a little variant this time and I think it is more useful. Again, it is full of limitations, but maybe it will further cement knowledge you have or generate some new thoughts.



What the heck is going on here!? Let me explain. I am sampling colors from the face and hair. Each number and circle on the right show where I sampled a color. On the left, in column 'C' I filled the square with the sampled color and corresponding number. Column 'B' shows each of the colors, but with all of their values more or less equalized to a middle value. Column 'A' shows the colors with their saturation levels maxed out.

For me, column 'A' is the most revealing. When the colors are all shown at full saturation, the narrow range of hues used is much more obvious. Look at row 8. That color is from the white of her eye! It is really a very gray yellow, but it isn't as clear until the color was pumped up to full saturation. It is also neat to see the progression from swatches 5 – 19, from the top of the forehead to the chin and up the neck and see the small shifts from orange to red and back to orange.


In the image above, I have arranged the same colors descending from red to yellow to show the spectrum of colors used in a clearer way. I kept the original numbers paired to the swatches. Again, we have the sampled color in column 'C', the colors almost equalized (there is a little variation) to a middle value in column 'B' and the full saturation in column 'A'. Now, column 'B' stands out to me. Look at the top three rows, where the reds are nearly the exact same hue, but vary in saturation. They appear more blue or purple, warmer and cooler mostly due to their different saturation levels (they aren't the exact same hue, but quite close). Look down the rest of column 'B'. See how the colors vibrate and pulse in and out based on their saturation? More so than the fully saturated column 'A'. The variety you can get by changing the saturation just a little is very exciting to me.



Color starts to do some interesting things as you drop out the saturation. You can achieve a sense of blue, green and purple by dropping the saturation of red, orange and yellow. It is as if grey starts to take on the properties of a compliment when placed next to a color of similar value. The gray gives your more saturated colors life that they don't posses on their own. By working the saturation, you can create the appearance of blue veins under the skin, the purple flesh some complexions have around the eyes and cheeks and the cooler tones around the mouth and jaw.


If you are curious about giving this a try, next time you are painting flesh work in a neutral gray of similar value to the color you are working with and see what happens. See if you can create the appearance of color beyond those you squeezed out of the tube. That isn't to say you should or shouldn't use a full range of colors to paint flesh, but it is a worthwhile approach and exercise to try it if you haven't.

Of course this won't make you paint like Bouguereau, but hopefully it will either remind you or help you see how wonderful gray can be in adding life to your work.

*The photographs in this post are from the Art Renewal site and the Truth in the Bright Light of Day blog.
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https://instagram.com/p/BVrmRCgnYtP/

https://instagram.com/p/BVrmRCgnYtP/
--
-nate

Why didn’t great painters of the past reach the level of realism achieved today by many artists? - Quora

https://www.quora.com/Why-didn't-great-painters-of-the-past-reach-the-level-of-realism-achieved-today-by-many-artists


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Thursday, June 22, 2017

Cut-Paper Collage Sketchbook Constructs the Charm of Small Towns



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Cut-Paper Collage Sketchbook Constructs the Charm of Small Towns
// Brown Paper Bag

Collage sketchbook by Clover Robin

Illustrator Clover Robin is no stranger to Brown Paper Bag. I was first wowed by her last year when I found that she chronicled her travels using collage—while on the road! Since then, I've been following her work as she fills her sketchbook pages with more cut paper goodness. Clover writes that she "delights in nature and all things botanical," and is "inspired by a childhood of woodland walks and countryside rambles." As such, her illustrations often feature quaint homes and beautiful blooms that utilize a bevy of color and texture. Although they're abstract, Clover arranges the brush strokes, splatters, and colors to build form. The result is both structured with a sense of spontaneity and freedom—sort of like being outdoors.

To see what Clover is currently cutting, be sure to follow her on Instagram.  She's one of my favorite sketchbook artists to follow.

Clover Robin creates illustrations inspired by "woodland walks and countryside rambles." They give her sketchbook ideas that lead to charming collages.

Collage sketchbook by Clover Robin

Sketchbook ideas from Clover Robin

Sketchbook ideas from Clover Robin

Sketchbook ideas from Clover Robin

Collage sketchbook by Clover Robin

Collage sketchbook by Clover Robin

Collage sketchbook by Clover Robin

Collage sketchbook by Clover Robin

Collage sketchbook by Clover Robin

Collage sketchbook by Clover Robin

The post Cut-Paper Collage Sketchbook Constructs the Charm of Small Towns appeared first on Brown Paper Bag.


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What Happens to an Aging Artist’s Eyes?



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What Happens to an Aging Artist's Eyes?
// Artist Daily

Frances x 3 by Sargy Mann.
Frances x 3 by Sargy Mann, oil painting.

After a minor vision scare, we are reminded of the fragility of the eye–these complex organs which allow us to experience all the visual beauties of the world. And, we are reminded, once again, never to take our precious vision for granted. But, like the rest of the body, the eye ages with time.

If we remain free of injury or disease, our eyes may only experience slight changes as we age, but even these small changes may affect our abilities as artists to judge subtleties of color, light and dark.

An Artist's Vision, Literally

Doctors Michael Marmor and James Rabin write about the aging eye of the artist in their book, The Artist's Eyes, originally published in 2009. Their extensive credentials and lifelong interest in art give them a unique ability to analyze the effects of vision changes on some of the most famous artists throughout history.

About the aging eye, they write:  "The eye makes fewer tears; the cornea may lose some clarity; the pupil stays smaller in both light and dark; the lens becomes thicker, denser, more yellow and less elastic; and the retina loses a small percentage of its nerve cells every year  . . .  as does the brain. Thus the elderly eye receives slightly less light transmits images of slightly less clarity and color spectrum, and there are fewer retinal cells to pick up the images and code them properly for the brain."

These conditions tend to lead to less contrast discrimination and more difficulty seeing in low lighting conditions. Under low light, blues and greens can become more difficult to distinguish.

Interestingly, however, under good lighting, even a small amount of yellowing of our lenses may not affect our ability to compare colors, because "our discrimination of colors is based more on the relative amounts of red, green and blue than on absolute wavelength."

It is amazing how well the eyes perform the complex tasks of relaying visual information to our brains over our lifetimes. They are, after all, organs exposed to extensive sunlight and high oxygen, unlike our internal organs.

Monets Glasses
Monet's Glasses The two different lenses in Monet's eyeglasses (the right lens is significantly thicker) were to compensate for a cataract that had been previously removed. The thinner and hazy left lens blurred images so that they would not interfere with the vision of the artist's right eye after the surgery, according to The Artist's Eyes, Vision and the History of Art by Michael F. Marmor and James G. Ravin.

Although it may be important to be aware of the visual changes of the aging eye, we agree wholeheartedly with the doctors, who state:  "For most aging artists, these mild visual effects will be less critical than nonvisual effects of age, such as maturation of style and technique, the evolution of art historically, economic pressure to continue or discontinue a mode of painting, and technologic advances in paints and other equipment."

For inspiration on an artist who continued his work after losing his eyesight, be sure to watch the short video about oil painting artist Sargy Mann (1937 – 2015) below.

And, if you are intrigued to learn more, check out the longer video below for more about this amazing artist who handled his disability with great grace. We are confident you will find it worth your while!

This video on Sargy Mann from Peter Mann Pictures first appeared on Vimeo.

Join us on The Artist's Road for more enlightening articles, interviews with top artists, step-by-step painting demonstrations and discounts in the unique Artist's Road Store.

–John and Ann

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The post What Happens to an Aging Artist's Eyes? appeared first on ArtistDaily.


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Wednesday, June 21, 2017

How to Use Large Brushstrokes to Build Composition



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How to Use Large Brushstrokes to Build Composition
// Artist's Network

From Still Life to Landscape — Learn Painting with Identical Steps

Lemon Wedge (oil, 6×6) By Karen O'Neil. Article contributions by Cherie Haas.

Learn painting — with boldness and a big brush. Karen O'Neil shows you how in this extensive step-by-step painting demo. And remember: from luscious citrus still lifes to landscape painting, the approach to composition always comes down to the same steps. But that doesn't mean finding a powerful composition is always easy, which is why Johannes Vloothuis' Paint Along 36 is Composition Lessons Using Mass Planning. Reserve your spot for the class and gain insider knowledge from one of the best painting instructors teaching today! Enjoy!

Courtney

Beginning Shapes

1. Using a No. 12 bright. If you aren't used to such a big brush, I recommend taking five minutes and just playing with strokes on a scrap surface. When you feel comfortable, block in the large shapes of the lemon. For me that came down to the rind and the segments.

 

 

2. Make each shape with one stroke of a No. 12 bright. Do a few fake strokes in the air. Hold in your mind how you want the stroke to happen, and then do it. The shapes join to become the flat plane, or the side of the lemon in shadow.

 

 

3. Using the thin edge of a No.10 synthetic bristle bright, I produce a crisp, clean edge—without using a small brush. Learn painting with big brushes not because it is easier, but because it forces you to really be aware of every stroke you put down. That's the key to all this!

 

 

4. Using a No. 8 bright, I put down the lemon rind in one continual, crisp stroke. Just because you are using a bigger brush doesn't mean there isn't precision there. Be mindful of still keeping to a light, controlled stroke.

 

Bring in the Biggies

5. My well-worn No. 20 bright makes quick work of the foreground and background shapes. It's mammoth, right? There's a lot of power in a big brush. Don't be afraid to use it. Start by painting backgrounds with it and take it from there.

 

 

6. With the same No. 20 bright, I block in the cast shadow. Notice the variety of the strokes. Big brushes don't mean you get one-dimensional art. Every brush has the same capabilities, but on different scales. It is all in the way that you use it.

 

 

7. With the shadow shape fully blocked in, I make the thin lines under the lemon with the edge of a No. 10 bright. With the same brush, I also make the more subtle movements of the half-circle shape in the center of the lemon and the suggestion of lines separating its segments.

 

 

8. With a No. 12 synthetic bristle bright and one decisive brushstroke, I reshape the rind by repainting the lemon segment to its left.

 

 

9. I need a #4 bright to darken the center seed shape. A larger brush wouldn't allow me the control I need for this quick, small brushstroke, but I challenge you to try. You'll learn a lot, even if you need to do some reworking.

 

Sweet Victory!

10. Lemon Wedge (oil, 6×6) is finished! I've captured the essence of the lemon; the light works, and each stroke has contributed to the compositional movement of the painting. While the paint was still wet, I scratched in my signature with the handle of a No. 4 brush.

 

 

The post How to Use Large Brushstrokes to Build Composition appeared first on Artist's Network.


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Artist and illustrator Karan Singh's hypercolour creations



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Artist and illustrator Karan Singh's hypercolour creations
// It's Nice That

Karansingh-illustrator-itsnicethat-list

Artist and illustrator Karan Singh has been keeping busy since we last featured his brilliantly eye-catching work on the site back in 2014. Whether he's making visuals to announce the launch of Nike's latest trainers or travel posters for Airbnb, Karan's distinctive work is always packed full of patterns. We caught up with the Tokyo-based illustrator to find out how life has changed over the past three years.

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Tropical Summer Scenes That’ll Make You Want to Escape to the Beach



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Tropical Summer Scenes That'll Make You Want to Escape to the Beach
// Brown Paper Bag

Summer illustrations by Angela McKay

Today is the longest day of the year, so it seems fitting share the work of Angela Mckay, aka ohkii stuio. Based in Brooklyn but hailing from Australia and Thailand, her gouache and watercolor paintings feature sunny scenes of swimming and trekking through lush tropical gardens. If you're stuck inside all day (as I am), each of these summer illustrations will offer a momentary reprieve from the computer screen.

Angela sells her work as large prints and on gorgeous silk scarves. Although everything is digitally printed, she creates the designs as paintings first and then transfers them onto the scarves—giving them a handcrafted feel. The scarves are now available in her online shop, and you can see her work in progress through Instagram.

Angela McKay will make you want to escape to the beach with her bright summer illustrations.

Summer illustration by Angela McKay

Summer illustrations by Angela McKay

Summer illustrations by Angela McKay

Summer illustration by Angela McKay

Summer illustration by Angela McKay

Summer illustration by Angela McKay

Summer illustration by Angela McKay

Summer illustration by Angela McKay

Angela's illustrations look beautiful on silk scarves.

Summer illustration by Angela McKay

Summer illustration by Angela McKay

Summer illustration by Angela McKay

Summer illustration by Angela McKay

Summer illustration by Angela McKay

The post Tropical Summer Scenes That'll Make You Want to Escape to the Beach appeared first on Brown Paper Bag.


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japhers: it always helps to use reference pictures but in...



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japhers: it always helps to use reference pictures but in...
// How to Art





japhers:

it always helps to use reference pictures but in general here's a quick basic process for really fast rose making if you're pressed for time :D just remember that the petals are usually more packed in the middle and get farther apart as you go outwards!


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3 Still Life Paintings for The Perfect Facebook Challenge



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3 Still Life Paintings for The Perfect Facebook Challenge
// Artist's Network

Take Three: A trio of friends who've never met in person hold a still life painting challenge across the miles.

A few months ago, I was chatting via Facebook with my friend and fellow painter Anne Hightower-Patterson White. Although we've never met in person, we've developed a great connection through social media.

We determined that we were both ready for a new creative endeavor and devised a virtual still life painting challenge. She brought our friend Susan M. Stuller on board, and we were off and running.

Simple Guidelines

We'd each select and share three favorite pieces from our glass collections, and then we'd each paint a still life painting based on some of those pieces. We shipped the glass items back and forth until we all had photographed a still life setup using at least five pieces from the collections.

The agreement was not to tell one another which pieces we had chosen—or to share our works in progress. There was a lot of excitement to see how our different painting styles would translate into compositions featuring the same subjects. Here's a look at our experiment—as well as some tips for painting glass objects.

Try It Yourself

I encourage other artists who are friends on Facebook or other communication outlets such as Instagram or email to try a similar project. It's always interesting and educational to see how someone else interprets the same subject through their own eyes and creative style. This even can be done internationally, by emailing the same reference photo or idea to friends around the globe and having each create a painting in his or her individual style. -Laurie Goldstein-Warren

Doing the Prep Work | Anne Hightower-Patterson White

STEP 1: I began the process by doing two 5″ x 7″ value studies (below) to work out the composition and plan the pattern of lights and darks.

 

Step 1

Step 1

 

STEP 2: I then did a complete 9″ x 12″ color study in which I tried out some darker shadows that I decided to leave out of the final painting. I focused on triangulating the colors to provide a visual map through the painting. For this, I altered a few of the reds and blues from my photos to improve the color harmony.

 

Step 2

 

STEP 3: I completed a detailed line drawing of the composition (3a) and then masked the areas where I wanted to preserve the white of the paper (3b).

 

Step 3a

Step 3a

Step 3b

 

STEP 4: I created the initial washes to begin to define the light values and establish the local color.

 

Step 4

Step 4

 

STEP 5: I removed small amounts of masking and began establishing the middle and darker values, as seen in the upper left.

 

Step 5

Step 5


FINAL STEP:
Once I had the values in correct relationship, I did what I call "a finishing step." I go through and tighten up shapes that seem ragged. If I've lost a highlight, I either scrub it out with a fabric dye brush or use a Mr. Clean Magic Eraser to lift color, especially staining color. I think the traditional scrubbers are a little rough on 140-lb. paper; however, the fabric dye brushes by Loew Cornell are just right.

If there's a small point to highlight, I'll use my go-to opaque white—Shiva white casein. In the final assessment of While the Fish Danced (watercolor on paper, 21½" x 28″), I determined that the lower corners needed less emphasis, so I used a neutral gray mixture and lightly floated it across the bottom from corner to corner, which helps to lift the eye to the focal point.

Final Step

Anne's Watercolor Tips

Begin by observing the glass reflections carefully. Do a detailed still life drawing of the reflected shapes on paper. Make any corrections before transferring the drawing to watercolor paper by using either transfer paper or a light box.

Avoid erasures on your watercolor paper, and use a hard pencil to complete your drawing to prevent losing your marks in washes. Mask the shapes that will remain white or very light.

Layer color one glaze at a time using transparent or semi-transparent colors. Ensure one layer is dry before applying the next.

After painting the initial glaze, apply masking to preserve the lighter values before adding darker ones. Remove the masking once the darkest values are complete. Use a small, stiff brush to soften the edges of the shapes that look too hard.

Anne's Watercolor Toolkit:

  • Paper: Winsor & Newton 140-lb. cold-pressed white
  • Paint: Sennelier: red orange, lacquer red; Winsor & Newton: burnt sienna, Winsor blue (red shade), cobalt, aureolin, Indian yellow, raw sienna, brown madder, sepia, French ultramarine; Daniel Smith: quinacridone rose, quinacridone gold, quinacridone coral, sap green
  • Brushes: Jack Richeson Extreme Kolinsky, Art Xpress Charles Reid Kolinsky

Using a Limited Palette | Laurie Goldstein-Warren

STEP 1: I do my initial drawing on oversized white drawing paper. When I'm happy with the composition, I move the drawing to my watercolor paper using transfer paper. I then go over my lines with a hard graphite pencil and mask off my whites and any other shapes that I want to remain pure in color.

 

Step 1

 

STEP 2: I paint in a glowing layer first using quinacridone gold, quinacridone rose and cobalt blue.

 

Step 2

 

STEP 3: When that layer is completely dry, I lay in my first dark layer (value 8 or 9) using quinacridone gold, quinacridone rose and Antwerp blue.

 

Step 3

 

STEP 4: When the dark layer is dry, I remove all the masking fluid and begin to paint in the mid-value (3-7) shapes using the same limited four-color palette.

 

Step 4

 

STEP 5: Once I'm satisfied with the values and shapes, I use a gray wash from the remaining paint in the palette to push back some of the glass pieces and bring others to the forefront of the painting.

 

Step 5

 

FINAL STEP: I achieve the finished look by masking off just a few of the white and pure color spots. I then apply a violet-blue wash over the entire painting to unify it. Finally, I use a soft brush to prevent disturbing the underlying layers of paint in Stars in the Dark (watercolor on paper, 30×22).

Final Step

Laurie's Watercolor Tips

Don't just shoot a photo of your still life and begin. Study the light, reflections, refraction and surfaces. Only draw reflections and shadows that are important; not every detail is needed. Join values that are close together to create larger shapes.

Soften the edges of masked elements in some areas of the still life and leave hard edges in others, always considering the variety and quality of your shapes. Push back some pieces in your still life; not all of the objects should have equal importance.

Laurie's Watercolor Toolkit:

  • Paper: Fabriano Artistico bright white 140-lb. cold-pressed
  • Paint: Daniel Smith: quinacridone rose, quinacridone gold; Winsor & Newton: lamp black, cobalt, Antwerp blue
  • Brushes: Silver Brush Black Velvet 1½-inch flat wash; Yasutomo/Haboku stroke 6060L

Building Up Shapes and Values | Susan M. Stuller

STEP 1: I photograph a variety of still life setups with strong light. After choosing several, I proceed with a few value studies and then select the one I like the best.

I do my value studies on tracing paper with a Sharpie pen and a pencil and mark the center of the paper with an "x," so I don't arrange anything in the center. Next, I proceed with several tracing paper layers to refine my drawing.

Step 1

 

STEP 2: When I'm satisfied with my tracing paper drawing, I transfer my drawing to my painting surface with graphite paper and mask the whites I want to preserve using Winsor & Newton masking fluid.

 

Step 2

 

STEP 3: I like to apply the glow colors first so I know where they are and can paint around them. Next, I wet the paper and add a warm light wash, dropping in some neutrals in
the corners.

 

Step 3

 

STEP 4: I start to build up shapes and values, gradually using colors I know won't lift as I proceed to glaze over them. Most of the light to mid-tone grays are painted using a mixture of cobalt and burnt sienna, and I occasionally drop in a little permanent rose if I want a violet tone.

The masking fluid is removed during the glazing process of this step, so that the hard edges of the mask will be softened in subsequent layers.

 

Step 4

 

STEP 5: I continue to refine shapes and values while adjusting the temperature. I wait until
I have more completed shapes before I start on the blue vase.

 

Step 5

 

STEP 6: I rewet the background around the glass items and, using a round, soft mop brush, I drop in a warm neutral wash using indigo, raw sienna and a little alizarin crimson. I also use some Dr. Ph. Martin's liquid watercolors to brighten up the strong colors in the marbles and some of the glass items.

 

Step 6

 

STEP 7: I start slowly on the blue vase. Putting in the glow colors first, I paint more of them than I need, knowing that as I change values I'll lose some of the color. I then add small amounts of those same colors around the painting to help guide the viewer as he looks at the painting.

 

Step 7

 

FINAL STEP: I continue to glaze color on the blue bottle as well as add several glazes in the background using the same indigo wash. I also use the indigo wash to push back some of the glass shapes.

Cheap Joe's scrubber is great for softening any remaining hard edges left by the masking. I decide to add a few cards to Something Borrowed, Something Blue (watercolor on paper, 21×29) to strengthen the focal point. I continue to soften edges with the scrubber brush and add a few final glazes to push the values

Final Step

Susan's Watercolor Tips

A great drawing is a must when painting intricate glass still life paintings. Create clear light shapes that make the glass sparkle, even crafting or eliminating some shapes for composition's sake.

Mask the major light shapes carefully; they'll be important to the final painting. Design is important to the overall success of the painting; don't make it too busy. Always keep the following in mind as you paint: values, values, values.

Susan's Watercolor Toolkit

  • Paper: Arches 300-lb. cold-pressed
  • Paint: Holbein: cobalt blue, ultramarine blue, Prussian blue, cerulean blue, alizarin crimson, burnt sienna, raw sienna, indigo, new gamboge, permanent rose, permanent red; Winsor & Newton: Winsor green; Mijello Mission Gold Watercolor: cerulean blue; Dr. Ph. Martin's: phthalo green, blue, yellow light, ultra-marine blue Brushes: Silver Brush Black Velvet
  • Brushes: Silver Brush Black Velvet jumbo round; Loew Cornell 6 and 14 rounds, 1- and 2-inch flats; 2- and 4-inch hakes

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Article written by Laurie Goldstein-Warren, Anne Hightower-Patterson White and Susan M. Stuller

The post 3 Still Life Paintings for The Perfect Facebook Challenge appeared first on Artist's Network.


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