Saturday, September 30, 2017

Colourful Labyrinth by Camille Walala



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Colourful Labyrinth by Camille Walala
// Fubiz

French artist Camille Walala did a collab with the Now Gallery to create WALALA x PLAY, a playful labyrinth full of mirrors and colorful shapes. This installation made for the London Design Festival showcases the designer very personal touch, incitating visitors to let out their inner child. A stunning result for visitors of all ages to enjoy.

 

All pictures are from Charles Emerson.              


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Cave Paintings Identified in Spain



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Cave Paintings Identified in Spain
// Archaeological Headlines - Archaeology Magazine

CANTABRIA, SPAIN—The International Business Times reports that four new sets of cave paintings in northern Spain have been identified with 3-D laser scanning and photometric techniques by a team led by Roberto Ontañón of the Museum of Prehistory of Cantabria. The sites had been identified by speleologists, but the images were degraded and difficult to see with the naked eye. "These technologies allow you to detect colors beyond the range of the visible spectrum (infrared to ultraviolet) and, in this way, 'reveal' paintings that at first sight are imperceptible or difficult to distinguish," Ontañón explained. He estimates the paintings are between 20,000 and 30,000 years old. For more on cave paintings, go to "The First Artists."
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Friday, September 29, 2017

Eye Candy for Today: Heinrich Böhmer Landscape with Deer



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Eye Candy for Today: Heinrich Böhmer Landscape with Deer
// lines and colors

Landscape with Deer, Heinrich Bohmer
Landscape with Deer, Heinrich Böhmer

Link is to The Greatest of Art blog; there is another copy of the image on The Golden Kite Forum. I don't know the location of the original.

Turn of the century German landscape painter Heinrich Böhmer had a wonderful touch with atmospheric perspective in his woodland interiors. I love the sense of filtered light dappled across the rocks, stream and forest floor.

 

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Thursday, September 28, 2017

Save time and money with a simple website



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Save time and money with a simple website
// www.freelancersunion.org

Save time and money with a simple website

This is a post from about.me. Are you a busy freelancer looking to attract new clients or build an audience? In just a few minutes, you can create a page to present who you are and what you do. With about.me, you can grow your client list or audience, market yourself without the stress, and centralize your work in just one link.

Freelancers Union members save up to $100 on about.me Professional! Get started today.

Whether you're an experienced freelancer or just starting out, creating a website for your freelance business is probably one of your top priorities. But a full-blown website can represent a lot of time and money, and you really don't need to invest a lot to create something that works. Resources like about.me allow you to set up a professional landing page in a matter of minutes.

Instead of having yet another excuse to put off building your business, here are a few reasons why creating a simple freelance website can help you grow your audience and find new clients.

Simple sites save time & money

Creating and keeping up with a full-blown website can be time-consuming and expensive. Plus, there are plenty of other tools that you should be spending your hard-earned money on that'll actually free up time for you to work on what matters.

Creating a simple landing page is easy to set up and can save you a lot of time and money. There's no dealing with hosting fees or worrying that your site will be down right when it actually matters.

Save time and money with a simple website

Simple sites resonate better with clients

It may seem obvious, but you have to remember that you are not the target audience of your website. Your potential client is the audience. When you create a complicated freelance website with pages and menus, it makes it overwhelming and intimidating. Potential clients don't know where to start, so sometimes they don't.

What do people want to see when they come to a freelance website? They want to know who you are and what you do. In other words, they are looking for a succinct destination to learn what your "career headline" is and gain some basic insight into who you are and what you do.

So, keep it simple. Your potential clients will become new clients. And your new clients will thank you.

Save time and money with a simple website

Simple sites allow for more flexibility

Being a freelancer is an ongoing learning curve. You might describe yourself one way in a meeting that really resonates with clients, and moving forward this might be your new descriptor. You might find certain work examples are more powerful than others. You might even decide to start packaging your skills differently.

Optimizing how you market yourself is part of the game, but you shouldn't have to put so much time and effort into updating your freelance website. With a simple, one-page site, you can easily tweak the copy without making major adjustments to the page architecture.

Save time and money with a simple website

Moral of the story? Marketing and personal branding is a core function of running your freelance business, but it doesn't have to be a time intensive effort. Simple freelance websites, done right, can be extremely effective when it comes to positioning yourself and your business in a clean and coherent fashion.

Freelancers Union members save up to $100 on about.me Professional! Get started today.


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It's Nice That | Animade’s playful animations for Sugru illustrate the joy of fixing

http://www.itsnicethat.com/articles/sugru-animade-sponsored-content-animation-280917


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DÔBUTSU SENTAI JÛÔJÂ - "The Most Dangerous Game" (2016)



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DÔBUTSU SENTAI JÛÔJÂ - "The Most Dangerous Game" (2016)
// 13

It's time once again for WTF!? Wednesday, and I've got a good one for you tonight!

I don't venture off into this decade too often, but when it's dropped in your lap and it's this weird, what's a guy supposed to do? That's right, make lemonade!
This Japanese TV series called "Dôbutsu Sentai Jûôjâ" came out in 2016, and this was Season one, Episode number 10 titled "Doubutsu Sentai Zyuohger" or "The Most Dangerous Game," and it should not be confused with the classic 1932 movie with the same name, or any of the many TV shows that have used the title over the years!

It's Super Hero Time! That's pretty much all you need to know!

This group of kids is pretty special! They can be normal people, or Power Ranger types, but they also each have special animal skills, you know, kind of like Spiderman, but different! One has shark powers, one has tiger powers, one has eagle powers, one has lion powers, and one has elephant powers!

This looks like a cool abstract painting!

This is Ginis, the leader of the Deathgalien! He's a real dick!
In fact, in grade school, the other kids called him Ginis the Penis! That's part of the reason he's so mad!

Ginis puts a deathray dome over the city! It's shrinking fast, and if it touches you, you're toast!

The kids look for the off switch for two months, and finally find it on a tower!

Yay! They find and destroy the switch, and the death barrier is removed!

And for doing that, Ginis rewards them with this robot thing called The Gift!
The Gift is so powerful it destroyed 10 planets the day it was created!

The Gift had been out of circulation because he was SO destructive that even Ginis didn't think it was fair, so he took him offline!

Their individual strengths were just not enough, so they cube into one giant ass-kicking robot!

Let's Rock!

Giant Vise-Grips vs The Gift's drill and circular saw, who will be the victor?

What!? ? ? ?
For some reason this was a two-part episode! Why it couldn't just be continued to the next episode is just as mysterious as to why it even exists!

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It's Nice That | Moonpig overhauls its brand using “cheeky humour with heart” (and kills the space pig)

http://www.itsnicethat.com/news/moonpig-rebrand-identity-graphic-design-280917


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Blooming Metallic Birds and Other Animals by Taiichiro Yoshida



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Blooming Metallic Birds and Other Animals by Taiichiro Yoshida
// Colossal

Hanasuzume, 2013. Copper.

Artist Taiichiro Yoshida forms the delicate wings of birds and fluffy fur of mammals from a variety of sculpted metal flowers of bronze, copper, or silver. Decorative hot metalworking in Japan is considered an ancient technique, beginning sometime in the 2-3rd century BC. Yoshida achieves the fragile nature of each piece through smithing, where the hot metal is carefully beaten and then formed into blooms before being colored. You can see more of his work on Artsy. (via Cross Connect, Hi-Fructose)

Fire Bird, 2014. Wood, grass, copper, phosphor bronze, bird's skull.


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Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Links from Class 9/27/17

99 Designs

Saul Bass
Debbie Millman
Coke Logo

JMW Turner
Avant Garde

grisaille
seth godin

local color

Michael Rothman



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Michael Rothman
// lines and colors

Michael Rothman, natural science illustrator
Michael Rothman is a natural science illustrator who appears to specialize in complex scenes of plants and animals in their natural environment. His subjects include both extant and extinct species.

Rothman has a superb ability to render highly detailed compositions — with multiple focal points of individual plants and animals — in a way that is both clear and naturalistic.

Some of his paintings are so naturalistic that they have the feeling of nicely painted landscapes that just happen to be intimate in scale. I particularly admire his representation of textures; many of his images feel highly tactile.

Rothman's online profile mentions that he works both in traditional and digital media, but the individual images in the galleries on his website don't have an indication of medium.

There is also a selection of his images on Science-Art.com.

Rothman's clients include publications like The New York Times, Scientific American and The New Yorker, publishers like Random House, Wiliam Morrow and Harper/Collins, and a number of museums, zoos and other institutions.

Some of his book credits as illustrator include: Here Is the Tropical Rain Forest (Web of Life), At Home with the Gopher Tortoise: The Story of a Keystone Species, The Forest in the Clouds and Jaguar in the Rain Forest (Amazon links).

 

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The dream-influenced photography of Maren Morstad



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The dream-influenced photography of Maren Morstad
// Fubiz

I'm Not Really Here is an ongoing project of photographer Maren Morstad's crude attempts to introduce elements of the netherworld into the waking world. Faces concealed, the characters are deeply influenced by her vivid dreams. These amazing creatures and landscapes come alive in a surreal and wondrous fashion.

The Oslo-born, New York-based Morstad owes her outstanding portfolio to "a combination of intense location scouting, waiting for the right weather and just pure joy and exploration." Visit her website and Instagram.


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10 Dos and Don’ts for Your Pastel Art



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10 Dos and Don'ts for Your Pastel Art
// The Drawing Blog

"Learn the rules like a pro so you can break them like an artist."

Woman with Pigeons by Pablo Picasso, pastel on paper on canvas.
Woman with Pigeons by Pablo Picasso, pastel on paper on canvas.

Wise words from Pablo Picasso, and the inspiration for me today because if you love pastel art but aren't sure how to really get the most out of the medium, this one's for you. Enjoy this list of dos and don'ts that we've assembled about pastel painting so you can steer yourself in the right direction and avoid major pitfalls and time sucks.

Where It Starts

Please remember that it all starts with three things:

  1. Shaking off old habits or assumptions about how pastels should be used. Should is not a word you need to think about while art-making, artists. It is all about what you want and how to get there.
  2. Rethinking everything you do with painting with pastel. If you have a process, question it. Scrutinize it. And try something new just for the sake of learning something new.
  3. Question what a drawing is or can be. Cast a wide mental net of all the possibilities that can come together through pastel. The only limits are the ones you put on yourself.

Pastel Art Explorer Dos!

  1. Use humble materials like newsprint and drawing paper so you can play.
  2. Use all the materials you've been collecting for decades. Now is the time!
  3. Take photos that give you lots of design options and compositional possibilities.
  4. Do A LOT of paintings. Stop often. And stop early. Do not seek "done."
  5. Explore and judge for yourself to determine what you like. Don't let other people or trends sway you. You've got an eye–use it!
Woman with Cat by Pablo Picasso, 1900, pastel painting.
Woman with Cat by Pablo Picasso, 1900, pastel painting.

Pastel Art Explorer Don'ts!

  1. Don't use your last sheet of an expensive support.
  2. Definitely don't use your most precious pastel sticks and materials.
  3. Please don't use a reference photo that's perfectly and symmetrically cropped.
  4. Don't keep noodling at something that you should have thrown out an hour ago. Not everything is going to work. Don't get bogged down. Be fluid and open!
  5. Don't ask your significant other his or her opinion. They love you, dingbat! They aren't going to give you the tough love or critical eye that you need.

Play By These Rules for Success

The biggest takeaways of this list are all about freeing yourself. Use simple and inexpensive materials that allow you to feel free because you aren't "spending" a fortune mucking about on or with expensive materials.

Make a lot of art instead of just one piece, so you aren't spending hours and hours chasing a masterpiece. Each time you take the art journey, you will find yourself better equipped to let go of out-of-this-world expectations and embrace the occasions that arise and let go of unrealistic expectations for yourself. Play by this different set of rules and you'll be happier for it.

To further your journey, embrace the sense of play that Richard McKinley always brings to his pastel art practice. His Pastel Impasto Painting Techniques DVD will show you how to create a bit of surface "intrigue" that tricks the eye. Your next pastel painting will leave people guessing. And you know what, let them! Enjoy!

Courtney

The post 10 Dos and Don'ts for Your Pastel Art appeared first on ArtistDaily.


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Paint a Monument Challenge



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Paint a Monument Challenge
// Gurney Journey

Public statues and monuments have been in the news lately for political reasons, but we haven't seen them as much from the artists' perspective. So I invite you to paint or draw a statue near you.


Here in Kingston, New York, we've got three 11-foot bronze statues, including one of the first governor of New York, George Clinton (1739-1812). There's an interesting backstory:
"The 1898 monuments are the work of noted sculptor John Massey Rhind (1860-1936) and were produced by the Gorham Manufacturing Company in New York. The statues were originally located [in the] Exchange Court building in Manhattan. When that building was being remodeled in the late 1940s, the sculptures, unbelievably, wound up in a junkyard as scrap. Fortunately, after seeing a newspaper article about the building remodeling, Emily Crane Chadbourne, president of Kingston's Senate House Association, tracked down the junkyard and sought to rescue the statues. She purchased and donated the statues to the city of Kingston." link for source.

You can paint the statue by itself or in its surroundings. You can paint it objectively or infuse it with your emotional reaction. And you can use any medium, including sculpture.

If a statue in your area has been removed and all you have is an empty plinth, you can invent a sculpture of your own imagination to replace it. You can be whimsical or serious with this one, but try to be convincing in how you render it. There will be an alternate "Plinth Prize" for this category. For inspiration, check out the "Fourth Plinth" tradition London's Trafalgar Square.

Lioness and snake by Diego Sarti in Montagnola Park, Bologna
My hope that we can really look at these statues in public places, and appreciate the pure artistry and craft that goes into them, apart from—or perhaps in addition to—their symbolic or historical connotations.

Rules
• It's free to enter and anyone can enter.
• Subject can be any statue or monument presented in a public place. It can be in bronze or marble, free-standing or bas relief, outdoors or indoors.
• All drawing and painting media are acceptable: casein, gouache, acryla-gouache, oil, acrylic, watercolor pencils, watercolor, pencil, or charcoal. If you wish to sculpt a 3D maquette in clay, Sculpey, or wax, that's also acceptable.
• No limitation on palette colors. You can paint in black and white, a limited palette, or full color.
• Just shoot two image files: 
      1. Your finished painting, drawing, or sculpture, and 
      2. A photo of the work on the easel in front of the subject. Your face doesn't have to be in the photo unless you want to.
• Upload the images to this Facebook Event page:
• Please include in the FB post a sentence or two about your inspiration or design strategy, or some information about your experience sketching the statue, about the artist who created it, or about the subject of the monument.
• If you upload to Instagram or Twitter, please use the hashtag #paintamonumentchallenge
• You can enter anytime between now and the deadline, Friday, November 3 at midnight New York time. If you do more than one painting, upload only your best and delete any previous entries.
• I'll pick one Grand Prize, five Finalists, and one Plinth Prize winner. The winners will be published on the blog GurneyJourney. All the winners will receive an exclusive "Department of Art" embroidered patch. In addition, all the prize winners will receive one of my videos (DVD or download) of their choice.
• Winners will be presented on the blog on Monday, November 6.
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More
Facebook Event Page: Paint a Monument Challenge
The Making of a Bronze Statue, (highly recommended) a 1922 silent film by the Metropolitan Museum that shows the arduous process.
Thanks, Studio Maywyn for the idea.

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Otherworldly ‘Earth Pyramids’ Captured in the Foggy Early Morning Light by Photographer Kilian Schönberger



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Otherworldly 'Earth Pyramids' Captured in the Foggy Early Morning Light by Photographer Kilian Schönberger
// Colossal

Photographer Kilian Schönberger (previously) climbed the Alps late at night to capture one of the mountain range's strangest segments, alien-like columns found in South Tyrol, an autonomous province in Northern Italy. His series Otherworld showcases the so-called "earth pyramids" in a hazy dawn light, strange creations that appear like stalagmites freed from their underground caves.

The structures are created by erosion, rising from clay soil left behind by glaciers from the last Ice Age. Each features a large boulder resting on top which protects the soil below. Eventually the tall columns loose the strength to hold the large rock overhead, shifting balance and sending it tumbling down the mountain.

The otherworldly elements remind Schönberger of the hoodos in the Southwestern United States, however the two naturally occurring wonders are formed from two very different geological processes. You can see more of German landscape photographer's work on his Instagram and Behance  


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I’ve had dreams like that, Lars Elling



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