Sunday, July 24, 2016

Peter Saville and Tate Design Studio create beer can artwork for Switch House pale ale [feedly]



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Peter Saville and Tate Design Studio create beer can artwork for Switch House pale ale
// It's Nice That

Peter-saville-tate-beer_list

Tate Design Studio has worked with Peter Saville to create a can design for the Tate's Switch House beer by Fourpure Brewing Co.

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Elena Éper's spirited illustrations to make you smile and squirm [feedly]



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Elena Éper's spirited illustrations to make you smile and squirm
// It's Nice That

Elenacrop

Spanish illustrator and designer Elena Éper has already begun making waves with her work for Reebok, Pull & Bear and Absolut Network, but it's her latest works that we've been making a fuss of. Initially created by hand, Elena transfers her works to Photoshop, "when working on a digital platform I can do things I would have never imagined I could do on paper," she explains.

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Painting Reality, Alexa Meade [feedly]



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Painting Reality, Alexa Meade
// this isn't happiness.














images Alexa Meade | instagram @alexameadeart

Painting Reality, Alexa Meade


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Art Competitions Equal Recognition | See Your Watercolor Painting in Watercolor Artist [feedly]



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Art Competitions Equal Recognition | See Your Watercolor Painting in Watercolor Artist
// Artist's Network

The biggest draw about being recognized in art competitions like the Watermedia Showcase, in our opinion, is publication (in this case, in the April 2017 issue of Watercolor Artist)! Of course, the prize money isn't terrible, either. This year we've doubled the cash awards—totaling $4,500! Think about what $2,500, $1,250 or $750 could mean for your art—and what having your watercolor painting appear in print could do for your career.

You only have until August 1 to enter: click here to show us your best work!

 

The post Art Competitions Equal Recognition | See Your Watercolor Painting in Watercolor Artist appeared first on Artist's Network.


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Spectrum 24 Poster [feedly]



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Spectrum 24 Poster
// Muddy Colors

By Justin Gerard


I recently had the opportunity to work with John Fleskes on the Spectrum 24 Call for Entries poster. It was a great project to work on and today I'm going to share a bit about the development of it with you.   


Development Comp

The scene is inspired by Tolkien's depiction of the fall of Gondolin in The Silmarillion.  

In the above comp I have drawn from several other development drawings that I created while immersed in the story. I don't always have such detailed comp work for my images, but I had the benefit here of a few years of drawings that I had created before I was ready to attempt the scene.  
In truth, there have been a lot of false starts and failures along the way. Perhaps I just wasn't ready to paint it until now. Perhaps I was lacking some small technical ability that has eluded me until now. 

OR perhaps I was cursed. Which is why I have placed all of my miserable little failed thumbnails in a locked box, wrapped that box in chains and even now plan to sink that box to the very bottom of the sea, so it's wretched existence and my humiliating defeats are known only to the muddy denizens of that vast watery grave. 
Or maybe I will throw it in a giant volcano of doom, and make it my scapegoat for all my artistic failures and we will have a good harvest this year. 
Anyway, all that to say, that painful failure is a wonderful teacher and i had all the near-hits to draw on for this one. And I had a really good feeling about the thumbnail pictured at the upper right of the comp. 


Toned Study 
of Elf knights having a bad time.


Tight Drawing 
on Strathmore 500 bristol


Watercolor

The painting itself was drawn on paper (using Caran D'ache Pablo pencils) and then watercolored. It was scanned at high resolution and brought into Adobe Photoshop. Photoshop is great because I am practically blind and it allows me to zoom in 1000%.  It also offers some wonderful tools for painting and working with lighting which feel not so different from their traditional counterparts.  The digital aspect of the painting begins with working in shadows, then highlights, then colors, then details.



Shadow Layers

After adding the shadow layers to achieve the level of darkness I want, I add highlights using a light grey tone on a screen layers. Working this way feels the most like adding the whites in the dutch flemish manner of underpainting. (Which is the only painting method that makes any sense to my brain) 



Highlight layers

Working in the initial highlights is one of my favorite moments of the whole painting process. Using screen layers allows me to not only lighten focal areas, but also add sharp details to them at the same time. Comparing the above image to the previous one you can see the figures crystalize and leap out from the shadows. I love this moment.  

This effect of using a screen layer to recapture lost highlights and also sharpen details is one that I will use several times throughout the painting whenever areas get too muddy.



Detail Layers

Color and details are added next using a variety of layer types: normal, multiply, color dodge and color using both normal and mixer brush types of my own sinister design. And while the colors and little highlights are important, the main statement of digital phase is made in the shadow and highlighting phases and I consider this the most important part of the digital painting phase.  



Final Painting

The Final Spectrum Poster will be going out in the fall. For more information on the contest and Spectrum in general visit them at Spectrumfantasticart.com.

We will also be selling prints later this year at Gallerygerard.com. Details on that and Sketchbook 2016 soon!







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Futura’s Paul Renner Tackles Color [feedly]



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Futura's Paul Renner Tackles Color
// Print Magazine

Paul Renner (1878–1956) is best known as the designer of the paradigmatic modern typeface Futura, literally deemed in its marketing materials as "The Typeface of the Future." Renner's life and work was significantly reviewed and chronicled by the English design historian Christopher Burke in Paul Renner: The Art of Typography, a must-read for anyone interested in the significance of type and politics. Verlag Hermann-Schmidt is planning a major book devoted to Futura to coincide with the symposium Translations 05: FUTURA – Tribute to a Typeface (Nov. 4 at the University of Applied Sciences, Mainz, Germany).

Before and after the Nazis relieved Renner of his teaching posts he was a master of technical precision. In addition to his rather complex books on typography and printing, his 1946 slim yet dense volume Color, Order and Harmony: A Color Theory for Artists and Craftsmen (published in Germany in 1947, and later by Studio Vista / Reinhold in 1964) was translated by the type expert Alexander Nesbitt.

I can only imagine the complexity of the German edition, but as Nesbitt notes in his foreword (below): "The text is, on the whole, straightforward and understandable; it should be a most salutary antidote to much of the material on color that has been put forth in the past few years …" But what I find fascinating is the Futura heavy text, which without paragraph indents and wide columns makes for a relatively daunting read.

 

renner001

 

renner002

 

renner003

 

renner004

 

renner005

 

renner006

 


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The post Futura's Paul Renner Tackles Color appeared first on Print Magazine.


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Splitting Color Illusion [feedly]



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Splitting Color Illusion
// Gurney Journey


This optical illusion by  shows two identical, flickering colored stripes that remain the same throughout the presentation. As the background colors change around them, however, the stripe changes its appearance.

Discoverer Mark Vergeer says, "When the stripe is flanked by a yellow/blue pattern, drifting to the left, it changes appearance, and looks red and cyan, drifting to the right, while the same stripe, flanked by a red/cyan pattern drifting to the right, suddenly looks yellow and blue, drifting to the left. This illusion shows that one and the same object can look completely different depending on its surroundings."

"Splitting Colors" was awarded the "Illusion of the Year" in 2015 (Link to video on YouTube)

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Tweet by 70s Sci-Fi Art on Twitter



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Shared from Twitter: More Great Work by Illustrator Lisk Feng | ILLUSTRATION AGE



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