Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Google's Art and Culture app turns your phone into a museum [feedly]



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Google's Art and Culture app turns your phone into a museum
// Engadget

Art is a big subject. It embodies the values of humanity, preserves our culture and serves as a record of our very history. Jumping into it can be daunting and scary, but Google just made it a little easier: the company's new Art and Culture app puts the works of over 1,000 museums in the palm of your hand. The app is more than just an online gallery, however, it's a suite of tools that allows users to dive deep into each museum's collection and beyond -- borrowing the best of Google Photos, Streetview and 360-degree videos to bring history to life.

Looking for art featuring horses? No problem: the app's search bar works a lot like the feature in Google Photos -- handily pulling out exhibits to match your query. Curious to explore a historic Cathedral? Take a 360-degree tour of St. Paul's with Google Street View, or pop your phone into Google Cardboard for a first-person experience. The app features daily news, themed lists and curated exhibits from partner museums, links to a new YouTube channel and even has a "Art Recognizer" mode that will identify paintings in select museums.

The app may be no substitute for going to your museum, but if you can't make it out to say, the Louvre, it's an incredible, easy way to experience humanity's artistic past.

Via: FastCo Design

Source: Google, Google Play


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Pinar&Viola creates holographic catwalk show for a virtual fashion line shown on real models [feedly]



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Pinar&Viola creates holographic catwalk show for a virtual fashion line shown on real models
// It's Nice That

Pinar-and-viola-hologram-catwalk_list

A team of designers has created the world's first holographic catwalk for an entirely virtual fashion line, shown using real-life models at Amsterdam Fashion Week. The holograms are projected on a transparent screen at 45 degrees, with a model standing behind in a skin-coloured suit, who moves to align with the movements of the CGI animated clothing.

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Go ask Alice, Roby Dwi Antono [feedly]



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How to: shading white horses tutorial by Nightsrunner [feedly]



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Tiffany & Co. 'Legendary Style' FW 16.17 Campaign by David Sims [feedly]



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Tiffany & Co. 'Legendary Style' FW 16.17 Campaign by David Sims
// Fashion Copious

Tiffany & Co. 'Legendary Style' FW 16.17 Campaign by David Sims

Models: Elle Fanning, Lupita Nyong'o, Natalie Westling, Christy Turlington


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Ian Davis’ picturesque paintings of bureaucratic dystopia [feedly]



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Ian Davis' picturesque paintings of bureaucratic dystopia
// It's Nice That

Ian_davis_paintings_of_uniformity_and_homogeneity_expert_advice_josh_lilley_exhibition_list

Ian Davis' paintings fascinate in ritualistic congress, graphically depicted in acrylic with alarming and disconcerting uniformity. These herds and hordes of men are dwarfed by their monumental environs becoming mere ant-like aggregate constituents in a larger social machine. Through careful composition Ian captures a simultaneously endearing and disconcerting surrealism, as their tiny forms gather en masse with rigid geometry.

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Gender Contrasts [feedly]



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Gender Contrasts
// Gurney Journey

Third Place, Illusion of the Year, 2009
What can you say about the gender of these two faces? 

They're sort of on the borderline, but if you had to say one was male and the other was female, what would you say?

Most people say the face on the left is female and the one on the right is male.

This is just an illusion because they're both the same androgynous face. The only difference is that the contrast of the features is increased in the face on the left, and the contrast is reduced in the face on the right.

According to the psychologist Richard Russell, who created of this illusion, "Contrast is an important cue for perceiving the sex of a face, with greater contrast appearing feminine, and lesser contrast appearing masculine."

He observes that cosmetics in women serves to heighten this difference, increasing the contrast, particularly around the eyes and mouth. "Female facial beauty is known to be closely linked to sex differences," he says, "with femininity considered attractive. These results suggest that cosmetics may function in part by exaggerating a sexually dimorphic attribute—facial contrast—to make the face appear more feminine and hence attractive."

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Tweet by Claudia Mangiamele on Twitter

Claudia Mangiamele (@ClaudMang)
Lixie
Bruce Riley
Paint & Poured Resin pic.twitter.com/puQtBuNxsO

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Tweet by gigi d.g. on Twitter

gigi d.g. (@gigideegee)
i was asked how to unify characters with varied pallets. imo, make ppl think you're using more hues than you are pic.twitter.com/MiuLmfsu3k

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