Monday, April 18, 2016

Links from Class 4/18/16

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_printing
http://comicsalliance.com/whatever-happened-to-barry-windsor-smith-in-the-comics-conversation/
http://www.comicsbeat.com/must-read-tom-scioli-on-goodbad-coloring-and-barry-windsor-smith/
http://www.tomscioli.com/?p=229
http://therumpus.net/2013/06/the-new-york-comics-symposium-r-sikoryak-on-digital-tools-for-comics/
http://facweb.cs.depaul.edu/sgrais/comics_color.htm

http://www.sitepoint.com/rgb-or-cmyk/

danismm: cyberneticzoo [feedly]



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danismm: Sci vintage [feedly]



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danismm: Sci vintage
// Hyperwave



danismm:

Sci vintage


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A vibrant but poignant look at LA life and its forgotten courtyards by TJ Tambellini [feedly]



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A vibrant but poignant look at LA life and its forgotten courtyards by TJ Tambellini
// It's Nice That

Tj-list

TJ Tambellini's photography is born of a psychogeographical concern with his own neighbourhood, LA, and among the bright pinks and blues and the Hockneyish pool fascination lies a more sinister message.

Read more


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Symbols, Archetypes, Metaphors [feedly]



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Symbols, Archetypes, Metaphors
// Muddy Colors


                                                               by Petar Meseldzija 
 

St. George Killing the Dragon - 63X50 cm, oil on MDF board, Private commission, 2016.

Greetings to everyone! It has been a while since my last post here on Muddy Colors. I started blogging in 2010, and after a couple of years of intense writing and sharing, various reasons have made me decide to stop posting blog entries.  Recently,  I felt again the need to share my thoughts and insights about some important aspects and issues regarding art and other related things.  

There is one particular subject matter that has kept me quite busy for the past few years, which is  the importance, or the relevance, of mythological symbols, archetypes and metaphors in Art and Life today. It is quite obvious that we live in very turbulent times; times marked by many changes -  some of which are quite fundamental and dramatic - times that are characterized by a process called demythologization of life and society.

An important question that is presenting itself today is: except for the purpose of entertainment, can mythology still be relevant to our lives? The answer is - of course it can! Moreover, it is needed today as much as before, and perhaps even more today than before because we have lost our collective myth (I am generally referring to the modern western society in particular). 

Rapid scientific and technological developments and the subsequent changes it brought into the world, have made some of the basic functions of mythology quite irrelevant (according to Joseph Campbell there are 4 functions of mythology). Especially its second, the cosmological function has become outdated. The first, metaphysical function of mythology seems to have lost the battle against our rationalism and materialistic approach to life. It's third, sociological function is now mainly controlled and governed by the various secular state institutions. It seems that only the fourth function of mythology, the  psychological one, is still pretty much alive. In other words, the way to make mythology still relevant and practically worthwhile to our lives is through psychology. 

Why psychology? Simply because the world of mythology is not some kind of a fantastic, imaginary external realm reserved only for Gods and other mythological creatures, and therefore inaccessible to human beings. On the contrary! Mythology basically reflects the stages in the development of the human psyche. Man has created the mythology - or better said it arose  spontaneously from deep within him, from the unconscious (according to some scholars) - and, now, this mythology tells about him, his condition and his journey. 


The psychology  offers a prism that enable us to "break", interpret and better understand the hidden meaning of symbols and metaphors that make up the language of mythology. There is no better way to express the fundamental truths about man and the existence but through the metaphors. Things change their outer appearance through times, but their essence stays the same. One of the main characteristics of these universal preconditions of existence is that they cannot be appropriately expressed through words, for they greatly transcend the language and its cultural and social limitations – sometimes they even transcend the intellect itself. The use of right (living) symbols, archetypes and metaphors is proven to be the best solution to this problem. However, being as  dynamic and as elusive as the very phenomena they are referring to, these symbolic interpretations are not the ultimate solution, for there is no ultimate solution to this problem, no final answer to the fundamental questions of existence, only temporal indications, for Life is fluid, and the Self is incomprehensible. Still we don't have a better way to express the inexpressible but through the mythological symbols, and archetypes – the metaphors. 

So, the metaphors are not supposed to be taken literally - they are no facts, they are just metaphors. They are no lies either, they are metaphors. They do not try to define, nor to describe, but to indicate the existence of these illusive fundamental principles of our existence, and to inspire a birth of a certain notion in the mind and the heart of men, so that we can develop a clearer and more comprehensive vision and attain enrichment and realization. They offer a necessary support to our psyche, and help us create a solid ground under our feet. 


Therefore, our own imagination and intuition plays a crucial part in this process. Because
in its very nature, all of this is both individual and collective, there is no universal formula that can show us how to deal with our own symbolic life. There are only indications, "guideposts", inspiration and the great mystery of Life, and the Self.

However, it is through these symbols that our deeper Self tries to communicate important message to our conscious part. This often happens in our dreams and fantasies. Ignoring and doing nothing about the message presented by the symbols that spontaneously arise from the unconscious leads almost certainly to some type of neurosis. That is why our intellect, from a certain point on, has very little to say about these processes, except, of course, for the subsequent and important work of integration of the suppressed contents from the unconscious (often indicated by the symbolic meaning of the metaphors) into the conscious life. 


Well, that would be all for now. I would like to end this entry with some unsolicited advice especially to those who found this article inspiring:

1 - cherish your imagination and intuition, for Life is a miracle, and true Art, being one of the most genuine emanations of that mystery, is a miracle too.
2 – read and educate yourself so that you can have a better understanding of the symbols that you use, or that spontaneously appear in your art. 
3 -  meditate for a while on the following quotation: "When Intellect comes in, Art goes out." – Harvey Dunn.
Have a good day!


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New Embroidered Psychological Landscapes by Michelle Kingdom [feedly]



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New Embroidered Psychological Landscapes by Michelle Kingdom
// Colossal

michele-1

Still the sky was blue

LA-based artist Michelle Kingdom continues to impress with her masterful command of thread and needle. Her stitched tableaus and landscapes depict individuals caught in the middle of intriguing yet ambiguous situations like something out of a dream, with characters lost in worlds out of their control or in the process of searching for meaning. She shares about her process:

Decidedly miniature in scale, the scenes are densely embroidered into compressed compositions. While the work acknowledges the luster and lineage inherent in needlework, I use thread as a sketching tool in order to simultaneously honor and undermine this tradition. Beauty parallels melancholy, as conventional stitches acquiesce to the fragile and expressive.

You can explore more of Kingdom's work on her Tumblr and Instagram. (via Lustik)

michele-2

It had already become the past

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Tomorrow will insist

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Because reality takes shape in the memory alone

michele-5

Here we can whisper

michele-6

Some imagined future

michele-7

Promises cannot obscure the sun

michele-8

Truth breaks a thousand times


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Carl Jung (Swiss, 1875-1961)Illumination from The Red Book... [feedly]



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Carl Jung (Swiss, 1875-1961)Illumination from The Red Book...
// The Curve in the Line



Carl Jung (Swiss, 1875-1961)

Illumination from The Red Book (Liber Novus), 1913-1930

"Everything else is to be derived from this… My entire life consisted in elaborating what had burst forth from the unconscious and flooded me like an enigmatic stream and threatened to break me. That was the stuff and material for more than only one life. Everything later was merely the outer classification, scientific elaboration, and the integration into life. But the numinous beginning, which contained everything, was then." - C. G. Jung, 1957

For 50 years after Jung's death, this artwork was locked in a secret vault. It was shown for the first time in 2009.

More Jung on hideback


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A Technique for Producing Ideas [feedly]



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A Technique for Producing Ideas
// Picture It

Technique.jpg

Creativity talk is hot right now. There are lots of speeches, workshops and books dedicated to it. I've taught a couple of creativity workshops myself, centered around Design Thinking which is most famously espoused by IDEO and Stanford University. But creativity itself isn't new.

Recently, I came across the attractive little book, A Technique for Producing Ideas at a library sale, written by James Webb Young, back in 1940. It looked so simple, short, and sweet, that I bought it for use as a prop in my office – an amusing relic of simpler times. Much later, I took the time to read it, but with the confidence that the subject is both too complicated and too mysterious to be codified in such a teeny text. However, it didn't work out that way.

James Young Webb was an advertising guy and his book grew out of a speech he gave to students at the School of Business at the University of Chicago. It was such a hit, he turned it into a book and it's been in print ever since.

James Webb Young's focus here is on the steps of coming up with new ideas that solve problems. Problem-solving is in illustrator's primary job. It's not drawing or painting or self expression that makes us valuable, it's the creation of visual communication concepts. Drawing, painting and expression serve the ideas.

So, to take a tiny book and make it even smaller, here are the general points:
Webb starts off by describing creative people as speculative. Refering to Italian sociologist (Vilfredo) Pareto's theory: to be speculative is to be preoccupied with new combinations of things. It's Webb's belief that new ideas really boil down to new combinations of old elements. And, the key to creative success is the ability to find valuable relationships in those new combinations.
Therefore, the job is not where to look for ideas, but how to look for ideas.

Technique2

Five Steps for Producing Ideas

(These are my titles, with Webb's quotes in italics and my explanations below them.)
Research 
Gather raw materials- both the materials of your immediate problem and the materials which come from a constant enrichment of your store of general knowledge.
Inform yourself for the task at hand as much as possible, but also be a student of the world around you, so as to  connect effectively to the broader population.
Work/Play
Work over the new materials in your mind.
Sketch, write, brainstorm for a new idea. Combine things to create new ideas. Work to create possibilities further in the process.
Don't Work
The incubation stage, where you let something besides the conscious mind do the synthesis.
Take a break. Sleep on it. Get away from the problem at hand.
A-Ha!
The actual birth of the Idea- the "Eureka! I have it!" stage.
That's when an idea pops into your head at a surprising time – of in the "don't work" phase. Or when you realize that you have some pretty good ideas worth revisiting upon getting back to work.
Fix It
The final shaping and development of the idea to practical usefulness.
After getting the idea, you need to get the idea right. Shaping the proper solution takes an extra level of thinking- even with the best ideas.
Webb admits that steps are seemingly simple. He writes, "…the formula is so simple to state that few who read it really believe in it." And, "while it's simple to state, it actually requires the hardest kind of intellectual work to follow, so that not all that accept it to use it… "thus, I broadcast this formula with no real fear of glutting the market (with great thinkers)"
As for me, I recommend both the steps and the book – available online in different forms.
It's a practical book for the practical art of producing ideas.

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creamurjeans: Martian Waterseeker ~ Michael Whelan [feedly]



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creamurjeans: Martian Waterseeker ~ Michael Whelan
// Hyperwave



creamurjeans:

Martian Waterseeker ~ Michael Whelan

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translucentmind: Untitled // Richard Powers [feedly]



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translucentmind: Untitled // Richard Powers
// Hyperwave



translucentmind:

Untitled // Richard Powers
 

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artsytoad: Juan Gimenez, Poster for the First Edition of Black... [feedly]



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artsytoad: Juan Gimenez, Poster for the First Edition of Black...
// Hyperwave



artsytoad:

Juan Gimenez, Poster for the First Edition of Black Star


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Albert Handell’s Pastel Painting Tip | Seeing Value [feedly]



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Albert Handell's Pastel Painting Tip | Seeing Value
// Artist's Network

In the June issue of Pastel Journal (on sale here), master pastelist Albert Handell shares his approach to painting adobe buildings, one of the essential elements of the Southwestern landscape. Vital to his technique is the use of lively, but harmonic color. To do this , he stresses the importance of using colors that are different but similar in value. Here's how he explains the idea:

HANDELL-adobe-in-the-landscape-pastel

Pastel artist Albert Handell shares his methods for painting adobe buildings in the June 2016 issue of Pastel Journal.

 

Muddy color can happen when colors of different values are mixed together or applied side by side. To avoid this, but still add color vibrancy to a painting, I use different colors of similar value. If you have two colors of similar value side by side, you'll see no edge, or only a "sleepy" edge, where the colors meet. Therefore, I mentally organize my colors by value (by different colors that are similar in value). With this in mind, my colors can be modified and extended easily. I avoid "muddy colors" and instead achieve beautiful colors.

The best way to see whether two different colors are similar in value is to make side-by-side swatches for comparison. See examples of this in the image here. It shows two different colors (see the upper right) Unison's Green #26 and Bluish-Purple BV-4.  Although very different colors, you can that they are similar value, because where they touch, there is either no edge between them (they swim together), or there's is merely a very 'sleepy' edge. Thusly, the values of both colors are the same. If both of these colors were photographed in black-and-white film, they'd both be the same gray on a scale of grays from white to black.

Different-colors-of-similar-value-

If two colors side by side show no edge, they are similar in value.

See Handell's step-by-step demonstration of an adobe painting in the June 2016 issue of Pastel Journal.

 

MORE RESOURCES FOR ARTISTS

You can have an entire of year's worth of Pastel Journal articles at your fingertips. Add the 2015 Pastel Journal Annual CD to your pastel library!

Subscribe to Pastel Journal magazine

Watch pastel art workshops on demand at ArtistsNetwork.TV

 

The post Albert Handell's Pastel Painting Tip | Seeing Value appeared first on Artist's Network.


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Colorfully Illustrated Notebooks That Feed Your Journal ~Obsession~ [feedly]



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Colorfully Illustrated Notebooks That Feed Your Journal ~Obsession~
// Brown Paper Bag

Mossery

I've tried different productivity apps, Google Tasks, and calendar reminders, but nothing feels as good as physically writing my to-do list down. My love extends beyond list making, though—I find it soothing and satisfying to scrawl pen to paper, so it's no surprise that I love notebooks. Not your average spiral-bounds—I'm talking beautifully illustrated covers with high-quality papers. Mossery is a shop I've recently swooned over thanks to their selection of delightful notebooks and planners. The colors are bright and feature a fun cast of characters like ducks in hats and pugs in socks.

"We believe in effortless sophistication, quiet confidence and living light—free from fuss and clutter—with just a little mischief thrown into the mix," they write. "So whether you'd rather roar or whisper, we hope to add a splash of color to your busy day."

Pick up a notebook (or three) on Etsy. 

Mossery

Mossery

Mossery

Mossery

Mossery Mossery

Mossery

Mossery

Mossery

Mossery

The post Colorfully Illustrated Notebooks That Feed Your Journal ~Obsession~ appeared first on Brown Paper Bag.


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