Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Love Conquers Evil in a Sculpture Made of 6,000 Handpainted Screws [feedly]



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Love Conquers Evil in a Sculpture Made of 6,000 Handpainted Screws
// Visual News

Love is a force of near-mythical power that comes as soft as a breeze. In it, we find ourselves seemingly capable of anything. It gives us hope on bad nights and euphoria on good days. It empowers us to believe in the beyond and stare into the future like the unknown is curtains lifting on opening night. The great beams of light that radiate within a person with/in love cycle through the nervous system like a particle collider in order to recharge the heart as a minimum and rebuild a fortress in place of whatever lesser organ pulsated there before.

But it's easy to forget that in a world of 24-hour news cycles that aim to build social media followings during an era of violence. But artist Andrew Myers wants to remind you that love is capable of stopping the worst actions that skulk through a human. His piece "Love Wins" may catch your eye as anti-gun artwork at first glance, but that's far too narrow of a scope.

The message here is that love triumphs over evil, because it can and it does. With more than 6,000 screws adorning the 6'x4′ sculpture at different lengths, each one hand-painted individually, ultimately depicting a finger clogging the muzzle of a handgun, Myers reminds you that the world is capable of as much love as it is evil, and one is more powerful than the other.

As he explained to My Modern Met in an email, "Theres so much beauty in our world but theres always constant reminders of uncertainty, evil and fear. Its obvious that our world is in distress, it has been for a long time. I started imagining a new piece of art that would translate purity, pushing evil back."

"Love Wins" by Andrew Myers

 

"Love Wins" by Andrew Myers"Love Wins" by Andrew Myers"Love Wins" by Andrew Myers"Love Wins" by Andrew Myers"Love Wins" by Andrew Myers


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On Location | Plein Air Painting Tips for Watercolorists [feedly]



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On Location | Plein Air Painting Tips for Watercolorists
// Artist's Network

Three pros—Richard Sneary, Brienne Brown and Glen Knowles—share their best tips for watercolor plein air painting in the June 2016 issue of Watercolor Artist. View a gallery of their work here, along with some bonus pointers, and learn more plein air painting tips in the June issue, available now at northlightshop.com in print or as an instant download, and on newsstands beginning April 19.

Or, for just a few more dollars, subscribe to Watercolor Artist and never miss an issue! Get your issues in the mail HERE or as digital downloads HERE.

 

Plein Air Tips from Richard Sneary

BUDGETING TIME:

I'll often set my alarm for 1½ to 2 hours, but because I've been plein air painting for so many years, I can tell from the sun's position how much time I have to get the scene down. I try to focus on what interested me to begin with—the light and shapes.

CHOOSING A SUBJECT:

Look for interesting light effects and elements that offer the best composition possibilities. You also want to choose a subject that best captures the character or feel of the place.

Carrie (watercolor on paper) by Richard Sneary | plein air painting

Carrie (watercolor on paper) by Richard Sneary

Under the Elm (watercolor on paper) by Richard Sneary | plein air painting

Under the Elm (watercolor on paper) by Richard Sneary

 

 

Plein Air Tips from Brienne Brown

ADJUSTING TO CHANGING LIGHT OR WEATHER CONDITIONS:

When the shadows, people or cars move, my value sketch comes in handy for reminding me where those elements were. If it starts to rain or the weather turns ugly, I grab my stuff and run. I've painted many times under the hatchback of my car.

UNIQUE REWARDS—AND CHALLENGES—OF PAINTING YOUR LOCAL ENVIRONMENT:

I'm from Utah, so I've had to adjust my palette to compensate for all the green in Pennsylvania, where I now live, as well as learn to accommodate for a wide range of drying conditions depending on the humidity. Needless to say, summer in Pennsylvania isn't my favorite plein air painting season. Nevertheless, I've fallen in love with the atmosphere here; you can see and feel the air, which is simply wonderful to paint in watercolor. Also, I love historical architecture, which this area has within easy distance of my home.

Lining Up (watercolor on paper) by Brienne Brown | plein air painting

Lining Up (watercolor on paper) by Brienne Brown

Sharing Memories (watercolor on paper) by Brienne Brown | plein air painting

Sharing Memories (watercolor on paper) by Brienne Brown

 

 

Plein Air Tips from Glen Knowles

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PAINTING ON SITE AND IN THE STUDIO:

For me, the process is the same. I start all my watercolor paintings en plein air and finish them from memory in the studio. I have practiced watercolor this way for so long that I have a hard time incorporating photographic reference. I generally refer to photographs only once or twice a year.

SPECIAL PLEIN AIR SUPPLIES:

I only use watercolor when I'm painting on location so I don't keep a watercolor setup in my studio. I simply set up my outdoor kit in my studio to finish a painting. I use a lightweight Stanrite aluminum watercolor easel because I like to hike to out-of-the-way locations. I have an aluminum and canvas folding chair and an old-fashioned TV tray, on which I set up my triangular ColorWheel palette, water container and cellulose sponge.

Hidden Pool, Big Rock Creek (watercolor on paper) by Glen Knowles | plein air painting

Hidden Pool, Big Rock Creek (watercolor on paper) by Glen Knowles

Gateway to Tuscany (watercolor on paper) by Glen Knowles | plein air painting

Gateway to Tuscany (watercolor on paper) by Glen Knowles

 

 


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The post On Location | Plein Air Painting Tips for Watercolorists appeared first on Artist's Network.


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Waiting for the End of the World, Chengxiang Shang [feedly]



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This year’s model, Kathryn Blake [feedly]



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Things Organized Neatly the Book, Austin Radcliffe [feedly]



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Explosive Cut Paper Sculptures by Clare Pentlow [feedly]



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Explosive Cut Paper Sculptures by Clare Pentlow
// Colossal

Clare_PentlowAM_04

Image via Ann Martin

Clare Pentlow makes delicate paper look almost dangerous, in the most organized and beautiful way. Cutting hundreds of sharp points into folded layers of paper, Pentlow forms circular designs that mimic the center of exotic flowers. The works are typically composed of a multitude of colors, yet the monochrome pieces do not pale in comparison to their bright companions. You can see more of the London-based artist's concentric artworks on her Instagram and Twitter.  (via All Things Paper)

Clare_Pentlow_01

Image courtesy of Clare Pentlow

Clare_PentlowAM_02

Image via Ann Martin

Clare_PentlowAM_06

Image via Ann Martin

Clare_PentlowAM_05

Image via Ann Martin

Clare_PentlowAM_07

Image via Ann Martin

Clare_PentlowAM_03

Image via Ann Martin

Clare_PentlowAM_01

Image via Ann Martin


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