Thursday, January 14, 2016

Hong Kong-based designer Jim Wong creates cheerful identity for 10DayFest [feedly]



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Hong Kong-based designer Jim Wong creates cheerful identity for 10DayFest
// It's Nice That

Jim_wong_int_list

Designer Jim Wong has created this fun and friendly identity for social innovation festival, 10DayFest that took place in Hong Kong last month. Organised by the catchily named Jockey Club Design Institute for Social Innovation, the festival featured a programme of workshops, film screenings and exhibitions.

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New designs for Tokyo 2020 Olympics logo, by some very young talent [feedly]



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New designs for Tokyo 2020 Olympics logo, by some very young talent
// It's Nice That

Tokyo-kids-logo-2020-list

Preschool children aged three and four have created designs for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics. The original logo for the Olympics was scrapped over a plagiarism row earlier this year, and the design has since been put out to an open crowdsourced competition. US-based designer Michael Raisch responded to this by asking his daughter's preschool class to create logo designs, all of which worked within the official IOC design guidelines. Michael took the children's creations and developed them into a logo, creating mockups of its application across everything from billboards and posters to flags and an aeroplane livery. "As a creative professional working in the sports branding field, I felt it was important to discuss the significance of creativity and expression in logo design over the trend of crowdsourcing," says Michael. No designs were submitted to the Japanese design contest, as they were created in the US.

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Clerkenwell Design Week unveils new visual identity [feedly]



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Clerkenwell Design Week unveils new visual identity
// It's Nice That

Cdw-studio-parallel-its-nice-that-list

London design event Clerkenwell Design Week has unveiled a new visual identity, created by Studio Parallel. "We feel that it's the right time for a change in design direction," says the agency's creative director Paul Fox. "We worked to achieve the right balance to add a new visual narrative, and still make it instantly recognisable as Clerkenwell Design Week to the audience." Set designer Kei Yoshino and photographer Lydia Whitmore worked on the campaign with the agency, creating five thematic images in total. The event's signature magenta colour palette was retained from previous years.

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Mesmerising and superbly formed set design from Elise [feedly]



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Mesmerising and superbly formed set design from Elise
// It's Nice That

Hm_elise_pink-love_full.6-lisyt

Like the Cher of the set design world, Elise needs just the one name. That quiet confidence may seem arrogant, but that's until you see the work and it's beautiful pastel shades of otherworldly brilliance. We assumed at first they were computer generated renders, but lo, they are in fact carefully constructed sculptures that have been commissioned for clients including The New York Times Magazine and Wallpaper*. Another sublime characteristic of Elise's work is in its ability to appear at once digital and organic, as forms curve around one another. This is most apparent in Pink Love, which Elise describes as boasting "pink curvaceousness." She adds: "Its fleshy corporeal forms press and push against the edges of its circular plinth; both plinth and final photograph of the work questioning the boundaries of its sculptural space."

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Cosmic photographs of kitchen mould from Nikita Teryoshin and Max Slobodda [feedly]



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Cosmic photographs of kitchen mould from Nikita Teryoshin and Max Slobodda
// It's Nice That

Kuechendienst_int_list

Losing Tupperware and dishes to mould is a pitfall of a lazily led modern life. But photographers Nikita Teryoshin and Max Slobodda have captured the beauty in these clusters of fungal growth in their ongoing series, K├╝chendienst, German for "kitchen patrol."

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Scientific Illustrator Paints Giant Murals Featuring 243 Bird Families [feedly]



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Scientific Illustrator Paints Giant Murals Featuring 243 Bird Families
// Fubiz

Scientific illustrator Jane Kim (of Ink Dwell) spent around 16 months to paint birds of 243 different species on a wall. Everything began during her internship at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, when her director proposed her the frescos' project. To make everything more impressive, she enlarged the size of each bird and even represented 26 extinct species such as the dodo. We also find parrots, budgies, smaller birds like sparrows and raptors like owls and eagles.

KimBirdMural30 KimBirdMural27 KimBirdMural25 KimBirdMural24 KimBirdMural23 KimBirdMural22 KimBirdMural21 KimBirdMural20 KimBirdMural18 KimBirdMural15 KimBirdMural14 KimBirdMural13 KimBirdMural12 KimBirdMural11 KimBirdMural9 KimBirdMural7 KimBirdMural5 KimBirdMural4 KimBirdMural2 KimBirdMural1
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Ivan Sulima [feedly]



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Ivan Sulima
// lines and colors

Ivan Sulima, childrens book illustration
Ivan Sulima is a Ukrainian illustrator who focuses on children's book illustration.
Aside from that, there is little bio information on his website or Behance portfolio.

Among his projects is a free interactive iPad book titled Rolling Pea.

 

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thevaultofretroscifi: Frank Kelly Freas [feedly]



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Harvey Dunn and His Students at the Rockwell [feedly]



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Harvey Dunn and His Students at the Rockwell
// Gurney Journey

Last week we visited the Norman Rockwell Museum to see the exhibition "Masters of the Golden Age: Harvey Dunn and His Students." 

  
Dunn was a vital link between Howard Pyle's teaching and a generation of story illustrators in the Golden Age of Illustration. The exhibit includes a room showcasing Dunn's students, including Dean Cornwell, Harold Von Schmidt, and Dan Content. They produced big canvases brimming with color, character, and drama.


For example, here's a painting of "The Count of Monte Cristo" by Mead Schaeffer (from the Kelly Collection of American Art). The head is lit from above by a greenish light, shadowing the brows, and the bright yellow / white slash of light behind is applied boldly with a painting knife.


Dunn's precepts were forthright and positive, leaving no room for weak or tentative handling. He emphasized the same kind of mental projection that Pyle advocated. For example:
Everything must be positive. Never in doubt.
Put yourself in the picture and the situation.
To eliminate takes a great deal of study.
A man cannot lie unless he knows the truth.
Two of the rooms show the work of Harvey Dunn himself, and the work is beautifully presented by the museum staff. His students made a life cast of his face and hand, and those are displayed in a vitrine in the show. 


Unfortunately, even though I came to the show wanting to love his paintings, I found them less inspiring than the work of his students. Although many of Dunn's initial ideas had epic potential, the execution often suffers from awkward drawing and heavy-handed paint application.  

We found a letter in the museum archives where Tom Lovell summed up the problem: "Harvey Dunn could draw when it suited his purpose—all the "old ones" were well drawn. Later he became more crude in drawing and value."

This crudeness, I believe, comes from skipping over preparatory steps and proceeding directly from idea to the finished canvas. Many of the Golden Age illustrators produced such a volume of work on such short schedules that they often dispensed with preliminary steps. Illustrators who neglect those stages are more hit-or-miss, producing work that is often sub-par.

I think the consistently high quality of the work of Norman Rockwell, J.C. Leyendecker, and Tom Lovell results from the thoroughness and professionalism of their intermediate stages: sketch, color sketch, figure study, charcoal comp, etc.



We finished the day visiting the Museum archives and the classrooms with Patrick O'Donnell, a game designer and teacher. He's doing a program called "Art in Motion" where he demonstrates drawing for families who visit the museum. He'll be doing it again on February 13.
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"Masters of the Golden Age: Harvey Dunn and His Students" will be at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Massachusetts through March 6, 2016
More on Mead Schaeffer on Illustration Art
PDF of Dunn's teaching "An Evening in the Clasroom"


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