Sunday, December 13, 2015

Eye Candy for Today: Frans Snyders’ Still Life with Small Game and Fruit [feedly]



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Eye Candy for Today: Frans Snyders' Still Life with Small Game and Fruit
// lines and colors

Still Life with Small Game and Fruit, Frans Snyders
Still Life with Small Game and Fruit, Frans Snyders

In the Rijksmuseum.

It't interesting to compare this painting with a similar subject by Snyders in the National Gallery of Art, DC: Still Life with Grapes and Game.

 

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Color Theory Part 2 by JohnoftheNorth [feedly]



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The First Artists [feedly]



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The First Artists
// Archaeological Headlines - Archaeology Magazine

Hand stencils believed to have been created more than 30,000 years ago have been found in limestone caves on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi.   Dating cave art is notoriously difficult. But a team of researchers has taken advantage of serendipitous conditions in caves on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi to establish that images there rival any known from Western Europe in terms of age. A stencil created as the artist blew pigment around a hand is at least 39,900 years old, they report, and a painting of a piglike animal was laid down at least 35,700 years ago.   The researchers established the designs' minimum ages by calculating the dates of deposits that had built up on top of the pigment. They had observed that, as mineral-laden water percolates through the caves' limestone walls, calcite gradually accumulates on their surfaces. These deposits contain uranium, which decays to thorium at a known rate, so their age can be ascertained from the ratio of the two elements.   The discovery raises a new question: Did people in Southeast Asia and Western Europe develop artistic expression independently, or was it pioneered by early humans before they left Africa? "We don't know," says Maxime Aubert of Griffith University in Australia, "but my opinion is it probably developed a long time ago, in Africa, and then it just spread out."
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