Friday, August 28, 2015

Eye Candy for Today: Monet’s Still Life with Flowers and Fruit [feedly]



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Eye Candy for Today: Monet's Still Life with Flowers and Fruit
// lines and colors

Still Life with Flowers and Fruit, Claude Monet
Still Life with Flowers and Fruit, Claude Monet

In the Getty Museum, also on Google Art Project and Wikimedia Commons (also here).

The Getty page offers a downloadble version that is very high resolution (60mb).

The Getty version seems unnecessarily dark to me (I haven't found museums to be particularly reliable when it comes to the color balance of the online presentation of works from their collections); the Google Art Project version seems unnaturally bright. I haven't seen the original, but based on other Monets I've seen, I suspect the balance is somewhere inbetween, and I've taken the liberty of adjusting my copy of the image correspondingly.

Monet's still life paintings can be just as much a wonder of color and texture as his landscapes, and often reveal more about his handling of darker values. I particularly love the contrast in this piece between immediately juxtaposed areas of shadow and bright, direct light.

It's interesting to compare this and other Monet still life paintings with those of Henri Fantin-Latour.


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Phil Sandusky (update 2015) [feedly]



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Phil Sandusky (update 2015)
// lines and colors

Phil Sandusky, New Orlenas cityscape
Phil Sandusky is a plein air painter, landscape, cityscape and figurative artist based in New Orleans. I've written about Sandusky previously, most recently in 2014. Since then, he has unveiled a new website that showcases his work to better advantage.

Sandusky paints the streets, parks and neighborhoods of New Orleans, and several other cities that he frequently visits, with verve, confidence and a keen sense of direct observation. To my eye, there is always a touch of wildness in his work, a sense that the painter has just barely contained the energy and light of the scene.

Ten years ago, Sandusky confronted another kind of wildness, when his response to the devastation of Hurricane Katrina was that of both a new Orleans resident and a painter, and he painted a series of remarkable views of the aftermath of the storm, that were eventually collected into a book, Painting Katrina. These were painted with simultaneous compassion and equanimity, party with the eye of a painter and partly with the clear observation of a reporter.

Sandusky will be giving a slide presentation about his experiences painting those works on this Friday, August 28, 2015, one day before the 10 year anniversary of the storm, at the New Orleans Academy of Fine Art.


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