Friday, July 3, 2015

http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode/color-you-remember-seeing-isn-t-what-you-saw/

http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode/color-you-remember-seeing-isn-t-what-you-saw/

1407-graymalkin-lane: X-Men #50, ““City of Mutants” November... [feedly]



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1407-graymalkin-lane: X-Men #50, ""City of Mutants" November...
// Hyperwave



1407-graymalkin-lane:

X-Men #50, ""City of Mutants" November 1968
Written by Arnold Drake. Art by Jim Steranko

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explore-blog: Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, adapted for kids in... [feedly]



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Paul Alexander - The very slow time machine, 1979. [feedly]



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Paul Alexander - The very slow time machine, 1979.
// Hyperwave



Paul Alexander - The very slow time machine, 1979.


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interplanetaryconnections: Bruce Pennington [feedly]



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gameraboy: Star Trek #24 (1974), cover by George Wilson [feedly]



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gameraboy: Star Trek #24 (1974), cover by George Wilson
// Hyperwave



gameraboy:

Star Trek #24 (1974), cover by George Wilson


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magictransistor: Frank R. Paul. Amazing Air Stories. 1929. [feedly]



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magictransistor: Frank R. Paul. Amazing Air Stories. 1929.
// Hyperwave



magictransistor:

Frank R. Paul. Amazing Air Stories. 1929.


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Kazumasa Uchio [feedly]



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Kazumasa Uchio
// lines and colors

Kazumasa Uchio
Kazumasa Uchio is a Japanese concept artist and fantasy illustrator. Beyond that, I have little background information.

Uchio creates fascinatingly elaborate fantastic landscapes — full of curvilinear Art Nouveau inspired designs, glowing windows, luminescent plants and lots of other deliberate eye candy — inviting you to browse through them in a leisurely manner, as though a tourist, drifting through one of his fantasy worlds on a flying ship.

There are some fairly large images of his work that facilitate viewing his detailed approach on what I believe to be his official blog.

Unfortunately, the navigation is a bit awkward for those of us who don't speak Japanese. Look for the sequence of yellow numbered links just under the main banner image, or at the bottom of each page, to browse back through posts in order. Browsing this way, you may need to be patient and persistent to get to some of the most interesting images.

Alternately, click on some of the links in the third section of the right hand column, which are categories. You can also try Google Translate.

You can also search Flickr, or search Google Images, or get a brief overview on this Russian blog post. (Those of you with accounts on Pinterest, Tumblr or Pixiv can also try there. I don't link to sites that require membership to view the images.)

http://blog.ucchieys.com


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It's Nice That : Minimalist architecture replicated in paper by photographer Nina Band [feedly]



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It's Nice That : Minimalist architecture replicated in paper by photographer Nina Band
http://www.itsnicethat.com/articles/nina-band
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Pastel Pick of the Week | Jennifer L. Hoffman Paints the Wonder of Nature [feedly]



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Pastel Pick of the Week | Jennifer L. Hoffman Paints the Wonder of Nature
// Artist's Network

In a new solo exhibition entitled "Wonderment," Wyoming artist Jennifer L. Hoffman paints the unique beauty of the natural world in the beautiful valley around Jackson Hole, where she has lived for 20 years. "I think 'Wonderment' kind of summarizes my experience of becoming part of this very special community," says Hoffman.  "I have never stopped feeling a sense of wonder since I arrived."

Hoffman-DoeEyed_12x24_pastel

Doe-Eyed (pastel, 12×24) by Jennifer L. Hoffman

Hoffman's latest exhibition follows a time of creative exploration. "A friend recently reminded me of the importance of play in our work," she explains. As a result, Hoffman has been enjoying an experimental phase. "I've been playing with oil and cold wax on various supports, playing with the surface of the paint, applying it with rollers, palette knives, and house painting brushes," she says. "I've been using pastels on interfacing fabric and on homemade surfaces."

Hoffman has also included more wildlife in her current work than has been typical for the landscape painter. "My focus in this work has been to capture the momentary wonders that delight me, which is not really a new direction for my work," she says. "But recognizing how much I'm delighted by the birds in my backyard, by the deer who frequent my garden, by the diverse wild things that surround us here, I'm enjoying my attempts to capture my wild neighbors in paint and pastel."

The artist will be donating a portion of her exhibition sales to the Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund in support of Nature Mapping. She explains, "The underlying idea behind my show is that, with careful observation of what is around us, there are moments of pure wonder and awe to be experienced in our own backyards, in our own hometowns. Being in touch with our immediate environment is our link into both a much smaller and a much larger, more encompassing world.  I feel like what I'm doing as an artist and what the Nature Mapping project is doing are two sides of the same coin: Encouraging people to be fully present in their own corner of the world, to make a record, to take notice. I believe that art and science can work arm in arm to elicit the value of wild things of all sorts."

What: Wonderment—New Works by Jennifer L. Hoffman

Where: Trio Fine Art in Jackson Hole, Wyo.

When: July 8 – 25, 2015

Opening Reception: Thursday, July 23rd, from 5-8 pm

For more information: Visit Trio Fine Art

 

You'll find a full-length feature about artist Jennifer L. Hoffman in the February 2012 issue of Pastel Journal available for download here.

 

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The post Pastel Pick of the Week | Jennifer L. Hoffman Paints the Wonder of Nature appeared first on Artist's Network.


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Sargent's Portraits of Artists and Friends [feedly]



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Sargent's Portraits of Artists and Friends
// Gurney Journey

John Singer Sargent, Ambrogio Raffele, 1904
An exhibition of John Singer Sargent's portraits of artists friends has opened at the Metropolitan Museum in New York, and will be on view through October 4.
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Sargent: Portraits of Artists and Friends

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Paleolithic Milk-Based Paint Discovered [feedly]



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Paleolithic Milk-Based Paint Discovered
// Archaeological Headlines - Archaeology Magazine

SIBUDU CAVE, SOUTH AFRICA—Researchers studying residue on a stone tool found in South Africa's Sibudu Cave have discovered a powdered paint mixture made of milk and ochre that dates to 49,000 years ago. While ochre was being used in what is now South Africa as early as early as 125,000 years ago to produce paint powder, this is the first time milk proteins have been identified in an ochre-based paint. The milk likely came from a bovid such as a buffalo or impala, and the paint might have been used for body decoration or to adorn a stone or wooden object. "Although the use of the paint still remains uncertain, this surprising find establishes the use of milk with ochre well before the introduction of domestic cattle in South Africa," University of Colorado Museum of Natural History curator Paola Villa said in a press release. "Obtaining milk from a lactating wild bovid also suggests that the people may have attributed a special significance and value to that product." To read more about the prehistoric use of ochre, go to "Stone Age Art Supplies."
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Tweet by Imaginary Cities on Twitter

Imaginary Cities (@Oniropolis)
Lampitt & Pudney's ideal city (Illustrated Magazine, 1951) pic.twitter.com/gWRue2SzNW

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