Thursday, June 25, 2015

martinlkennedy: Missions End by John Berkey 1978 (From his... [feedly]



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martinlkennedy: Missions End by John Berkey 1978 (From his...
// Hyperwave



martinlkennedy:

Missions End by John Berkey 1978 (From his anthology John Berkey- Painted Space, published 1991)


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French artist Amandine Urruty's illustrations are wonderfully bizarre [feedly]



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French artist Amandine Urruty's illustrations are wonderfully bizarre
// It's Nice That

Amandine_urruty_itsnicethat_list

There's something charmingly bizarre about Amandine Urruty's illustrations. Like Victorian portraits, the French artist's characters sit quietly, are well-behaved and have excellent posture but the subjects and the commotion that surrounds them is what makes them so interesting.

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Van Gogh’s BirdsVincent Van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890)Wheatfield... [feedly]



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Van Gogh's BirdsVincent Van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890)Wheatfield...
// The Curve in the Line







Van Gogh's Birds

Vincent Van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890)

  • Wheatfield with Crows, 1890
  • Studies of Dead Sparrows, 1885

  • Four Swifts with Landscape Sketches, 1887

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The Royal Academy’s Summer Exhibition is an irreverent blaze of colour [feedly]



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The Royal Academy's Summer Exhibition is an irreverent blaze of colour
// It's Nice That

Royal_academy_summer_exhibition_poster_list

 
I never thought I'd use the word irreverent to describe the Summer Exhibition at the Royal Academy. Since 1769 the RA has taken a fairly unwavering and conservative approach to the world's largest open submission exhibition, hanging up to 1,000 works by both amateur artists and great names. Long the lacklustre foxhole of stuffy Academicians and part-time painters, this year marks the greatest effort the RA has made yet to reinvigorate the English summer stalwart.
 
It's no surprise that the man behind the brightest, boldest edition yet is Michael Craig-Martin, this year's curator and the artist best known for his Pop Art palette and his tutorship of YBA trailblazers Damien Hirst and Sarah Lucas. Among his modernisms for the show is the decision to repaint the three central galleries in colours lifted straight from his work: hot pink, turquoise and baby blue. Far from playing to mere spectacle, Craig-Martin's trademark penchant for polychrome is a bold statement that does away with both the white cube mis-en-scène of contemporary art and the fusty grandeur of the Academy. Regular attendees might also notice he has made the print galleries more central.

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Drawing Den’s Artist Inspiration of the WeekFeatured Artist:... [feedly]



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Drawing Den's Artist Inspiration of the WeekFeatured Artist:...
// How to Art













Drawing Den's Artist Inspiration of the Week
Featured Artist: Kelsey Beckett

Deviantart | Website | Tumblr


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Annica Lydenberg [feedly]



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Taking That Leap of Faith [feedly]



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Taking That Leap of Faith
// Artist Daily

Artists who step outside their studios take a leap of faith. When you determine that you are ready to create a plein air painting, you take a chance with lighting, composition, color, and time. All of these are variables that you need to contend with to get your outdoor painting right.

Artist Robin Purcell takes that leap of faith and has been richly rewarded with her plein air watercolor art. Painting outside, she doesn't shoehorn what she finds into what she wants to paint. Instead, she makes magic with what she finds, and this is key to an enjoyable and rewarding plein air painting experience.

Summer Oak by Robin Purcell, watercolor painting, 10 x 12.
Summer Oak by Robin Purcell, watercolor painting, 10 x 12.

For example, in Purcell's plein air painting Summer Oak, the artist observes a scorching hot afternoon when the sun is at its highest, and she sees how the reflected light turns the top leaves of an oak tree deep orange, while its lower branches remain a verdant green. When she walks above a field of wildflowers that still have lush color to them but are surrounded by woody purples and browns of nearby scrub trees, she jumps right in and makes the most of it.

Wild at Heart by Robin Purcell, watercolor painting, 14 x 14.
Wild at Heart by Robin Purcell, watercolor painting, 14 x 14.

Painting outdoors can be a panacea if you are feeling constricted and uninspired in the studio, but I remind myself that taking those steps outside means you are playing by Mother Nature's rules. That's more than OK with me, but you have to be open and not take those small and simple gifts of beauty that you see around you for granted. They're the ones that need painting most!

But before I get too ahead of myself on the beauty of the plein air approach, I remind myself that painting is not only a leap of faith; it is also a skill-based enterprise. One of the best places to get foundational painting techniques--as well as to learn more advanced methods for plein air watercolor painting--is from an artist-instructor whose work you admire. An artist that fits the bill is Stephen Quiller and his DVD, Water Media Foundation for the Painter is a stellar resource for mastering watercolor techniques and the 8 hours of instruction (yep!) will open your eyes to even greater possibilities with the medium. Enjoy!


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How to Establish a Mood for More Impact [feedly]



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How to Establish a Mood for More Impact
// Artist's Network

Over the years and after hundreds of sales, I can safely say that when I've sold my art to a married couple, it's been my experience that mostly women are the ones who decide which painting to purchase, and most husbands follow along. Some of the most popular subjects are rustic buildings with flowers. Pet portraits are also best sellers, but for this blog I will zero in on landscape paintings. But this is just my reflection–there's more to making art that sells, and that includes establishing a certain mood in the landscape painting, for all viewers, regardless of gender.

Landscape painting: How to Establish a Mood for More Impact by Johannes Vloothuis | ArtistsNetwork.com

Carmel Mission, located in the town of Carmel, CA, is a wonderful setting with the flowers surrounding it.

What will also help you sell your art establishing a mood that shows the viewer an uncommon scenario, one he doesn't see several hours during the day. The late Thomas Kinkade knew this all too well. It isn't easy for viewers to get excited with small paintings that show the average day time scene. I travel and do live demos in front of dozens of artists.

I mostly depict scenes that will show twilight, sunsets, pink skies, foggy scenes and nocturnes. Here are some landscape paintings with examples of established moods.

[New from North Light Shop > Johannes Vloothuis has a brand NEW BOOK available! Click here to get your copy of Landscape Painting Essentials today!

Landscape painting: How to Establish a Mood for More Impact by Johannes Vloothuis | ArtistsNetwork.com

Fog is a very reliable tool to create the illusion of depth. Do you feel you can walk deeper and deeper into the woods?

Landscape painting: How to Establish a Mood for More Impact by Johannes Vloothuis | ArtistsNetwork.com

This early morning scene takes place in Rockport, MA. It's in an overall warm scenario. Most viewers appreciate paintings with predominantly warm colors. Of these warm colors, orange and red-orange are the most favored. Because this type of sky does not last long, you can say it's an "out of ordinary" appearance. The lights make the homes very inviting.

Landscape painting: How to Establish a Mood for More Impact by Johannes Vloothuis | ArtistsNetwork.com

This twilight winter rendering, where the sun is just about to set, results in several warm colors glowing. The lavenders help bring relief to the warm colors. Take into account that a painting can be too warm, as well as too cool. The goal is to balance these two opposing color temperatures just right. Only one temperature should be predominant.

Landscape painting: How to Establish a Mood for More Impact by Johannes Vloothuis | ArtistsNetwork.com

The sky dictates the mood as well as the overall colors. When I added the highlights on the rocks I used the same colors as in the sky, just in a different value.

Landscape painting: How to Establish a Mood for More Impact by Johannes Vloothuis | ArtistsNetwork.com

Nocturne scenes are definitely considered as painting with moods. Because of the dark environment lots of details are left out so the viewer interacts with his imagination.

Landscape painting: How to Establish a Mood for More Impact by Johannes Vloothuis | ArtistsNetwork.com

How about adding some sun rays for a spiritual touch?

"The Complete Essentials of Painting Water" and other video courses are available at NorthLightShop.com. North Light has also just released a new eBook written by Johannes titled Landscape Painting Essentials. Join his online art classes at http://improvemypaintings.com.

The post How to Establish a Mood for More Impact appeared first on Artist's Network.


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german-expressionists: Egon Schiele, House with Shingles, 1915 [feedly]



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Faber-Castell (@FaberCastell)
#Throwbackthursday to these beautiful ink bottles and wax crayons from our 1897 sales catalogue! #since1761 #tbt pic.twitter.com/Hc0PFqZK5G

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