Saturday, February 28, 2015

Dinotopia: The Fantastical Art of James Gurney at Stamford Museum [feedly]



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Dinotopia: The Fantastical Art of James Gurney at Stamford Museum
// lines and colors

Dinotopia: The Fantastical Art of James Gurney at Stamford Museum
James Gurney has become widely known for his instructional books and videos as well as his role as a plein air painter, lecturer and popular blogger, but it was his series of fantastic Dinotopia adventure picture books that originally attracted the most notice — in the art community, the paleo art community and among the dedicated readers who came to love the books.

In the Dinotopia series, Gurney brings to bear his study of classical artists and techniques — and in particular, late 19th century academic art — to create a world in which dinosaurs and humans co-exist amid architectural and natural splendor.

Dinotopia: The Fantastical Art of James Gurney is an exhibit of over 50 original paintings from the series, along with maquettes, models and related material, currently on display at the Stamford Museum and Nature Center in Stamford, CT.

You can read a post from Gurney's blog about the exhibit, which runs until May 25, 2015.

Gurney points out that this exhibit is completely different from the one that was at the Lyman Allyn Art Museum in CT a few years ago, but I think it is similar in scope and contents to the Dinotopia exhibits at the New Hampshire Institute of Art in 2013, and the one I has the pleasure of seeing at the Delaware Art Museum in 2010. If so, I can vouch for it as a terrific show, one of broader interest than you might think. Gurney's influences and technique transcend the genres of paleo and fantasy art, and encompass classical art in many ways.

As far as I know, there isn't a gallery of works specifically from the exhibition, but you can see Dinotopia art in general on the Dinotopia website, James Gurney's website, and his blog, GurneyJourney.


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William S. Burroughs on Creativity [feedly]



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William S. Burroughs on Creativity
// Hyperwave

William S. Burroughs on Creativity:

zumzeig:

"The word "should" should never arise — there is no such concept as "should" with regard to art… ."


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Link from Twitter

Decoding #TheDress with Color Artist Nathan Fairbairn
comicsalliance.com/decoding-thedress-color-artist-nathan-fairbairn-makes-sense-of-the-madness

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