Monday, December 15, 2014

Caspar David Friedrich - The Tree of Crows [feedly]



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sciencefictiongallery: Frank Frazetta - Into the Aether, 1974. [feedly]



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Frank Duveneck [feedly]



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Frank Duveneck
// lines and colors

Frank Duveneck
While other late 19th century American painters were flocking to Paris for their training, returning with the influences of the Impressionists burning bright on their palettes, Kentucky-born Frank Duveneck, the son of a German Immigrant, studied at the Royal Academy of Munich, where he learned and equally new and painterly, but darker toned style of realism.

Many of his portraits were focused on bravura brushwork, with their backgrounds left rough and unfinished.

Duveneck's work eventually attracted the attention of both patrons and prospective students, and he returned to Europe and established a school in Munich. He also traveled in Italy, painting particularly striking views of Venice, as well as creating a series of etchings, somewhat in the vein of Whistler's. In italy, he brightened his palette, but restrained his bravura brushwork.

He was an influential teacher, whose students included John Henry Twachtman and John White Alexander. Duveneck was an associate and informal student of William Merritt Chase. and he associated with other well known artists of the time, painting portraits of several.

After the death of his wife, he returned to the U.S. where he taught at the Art Academy of Cincinnati. His legacy as both a painter and a teacher is still influential on numerous contemporary artists.


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noelarthurian: electricalice: while this is mostly about... [feedly]



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noelarthurian: electricalice: while this is mostly about...
// Art and Reference point

















noelarthurian:

electricalice:

while this is mostly about facts, there are a lot of opinions in this tutorial (namely my distrust on several brands marketing strategies, and my opinion that's better to start with cheap student quality stuff. LOTS of people disagree on that point) as well that you should take as what they are: personal opinions.

here is slightly more readable than on tumblr

this is the result of several years of research on creating a cheap but high quality palette that would help me.

other things to be aware of: pigments are generally more resistant in oil and acrylics than they are in watercolor. but there are a couple of pigments that work well in watercolor but really badly in oil.

resources
pigments through the ages
a comprehensive guide to watercolor pigments and a lot of tests on popular brands
about van gogh's bedroom
Blue and Yellow don't make green by Michael Wilcox

Very good infographic!

I would like to add the Daniel Smith brand to that tiny chart in the third image. They can be a little hard to find save ordering them from Daniel Smith, but they have a lot of really unusual and unique pigments in their artist quality watercolor collection, including interference paints and other cool shit. These are what I use, save a few W&N Cotman colors I haven't replaced yet.


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