Sunday, November 2, 2014

eatsleepdraw: I call this “Robots Marching” if you like to... [feedly]



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eatsleepdraw: I call this "Robots Marching" if you like to...
// Hyperwave



eatsleepdraw:

I call this "Robots Marching" if you like to follow this painting's progress and see my other works, please visit http://raywangart.wordpress.com/


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Kay Nielsen (Danish-American, 1886-1957) Concept Art for Night... [feedly]



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Kay Nielsen (Danish-American, 1886-1957) Concept Art for Night...
// The Curve in the Line





Kay Nielsen (Danish-American, 1886-1957)

Concept Art for Night on Bald Mountain, circa 1939

Kay Nielsen was an art nouveau illustrator who specialized in books for children. He worked as a concept artist for the Walt Disney Company from 1937-1941. By the 1950's, his style had fallen out of fashion, and he died in poverty in Los Angeles.

More Kay Nielsen


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Pawel Kuczynski [feedly]



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Pawel Kuczynski
// lines and colors

Pawel Kuczynski
Pawel Kuczynski is a Polish artist whose illustrations combine characteristics of satirical social commentary cartoons and editorial illustration.

Using a rendered style, Kuczynski uses metaphor and logical twists to point out injustice, absurdity, greed, and other social ills, as well as simply exploring some whimsical flights of fancy. His overall range of targets, and something in his approach, put me in mind of work from the 1960s by American satirical cartoonist Ron Cobb.

Many of Kuczynski's images are deliberately intended to be provocative or unpleasant, some are wistful and more positive, like his commentary on the wonders to be found in books.

The images on his own website are inexplicably small, making it difficult at times to see the details in which the point of the image is often to be found. There is a selection of images available as prints through Pictorem, where larger images are available.

You can also find larger images of Kuczynski's work on ToonPool some other sites I've listed below.

[Via The Mind Unleashed, by way of StumbleUpon]


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Eye Candy for Today: The Sense of Sight, Annie Louisa Swynnerton [feedly]



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Eye Candy for Today: The Sense of Sight, Annie Louisa Swynnerton
// lines and colors

The Sense of Sight, Annie Louisa Swynnerton
The Sense of Sight, Annie Louisa Swynnerton (née Robinson)

On Google Art Project, downloadable file on Wikimedia Commons, original is in the Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool.

Swynnerton depicts an angel enraptured by the visual world, as no doubt was the artist.


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Weaving warm and cool threads throughout the picture [feedly]



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Weaving warm and cool threads throughout the picture
// Gurney Journey

Hans Heysen (1884-1968) was an Australian painter who was born in Germany. He achieved a luminous, colorful effect with a very simple warm-cool palette.

In the watercolor painting "Midsummer Morning" 1908, his color range is restricted to blues and yellow/orange colors. You could achieve this effect with just ultramarine and raw sienna, and maybe a raw umber for darks. 

The warm-against-cool is orchestrated throughout the image as a whole, but also in its microcosm of small planes. In these details of the image, note how the far forest is held to an atmospheric light, cool value, with the nearer tree trunks edge lit and receiving warm reflected light. 

In the shadow side of the sheep in the sunlight, the top planes receive blue skylight, while the bottom planes receive warm reflected light. The bellies of the sheep in shadow receive much less of that bouncing warm light, so they're darker. 
These effects are most striking when looking toward the light, whether in watercolor (above), or oil (below).

Hans Heysen, Droving Into the Light, 1914-21, oil on canvas, 121.9 (h) x 152.4 (w) cm

Heysen himself said, "Keeping the trees solid in the morning light was the difficult thing, I think it was something I was striving for all my life really. The subtlety of the tree combined with the beauty; the bulk, the solidity of the tree, and the character of its growth. And the movement, that's something we mustn't forget … I had my special trees, and they altered their appearance—the time of the year and the angle of the sun made all the difference. You could paint a tree one day and get all its various facets. And the next day it would be a different tree."
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More about Heysen at the website of the National Gallery of Australia

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