Monday, August 11, 2014

Mind Blowing Watercolour Art Lessons with Joseph Zbukvic

Assignments:

Color Wheel Collage
Color spikes
Making color viewfinder
Analogous "how green" is the grass?
Arranging color chips
Color chip matching
Matching color chips under reflected light
5x6 Color grid warm-cool
3d experiment, matching cyan-red
Scavenger hunt
Coloring book page - color harmonies
Music "color" swatches
Film swatches
Mood swatches
Seasons composition
3d Color Spikes- Product Swatch
Candy Cards

Chopped Straw [feedly]



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Chopped Straw
// Gurney Journey

Some painters of the nineteenth century had a way of building up tones with crosshatched strokes, which they referred to as "chopped straw."

John Henry Hill, "Plums," Watercolor
The technique gives a fuzzy effect reminiscent of engravings of the period. The term was coined by British art critic John Ruskin, an artist himself, whose advocacy of the patient study of nature inspired artists in both England and the USA. Ruskin wrote:
"If a colour is to be darkened by superimposed portions of another, it is, in many cases, better to lay the uppermost colour in rather vigorous small touches, like finely chopped straw, over the under one, than to lay it on as a tint, for two reasons : the first, that the play of the two colours together is pleasant to the eye ; the second, that much expression of form may be got by wise administration of the upper dark touches."
The Elements of Drawing, page 157

Henry Roderick Newman, "Wild Flowers," 1890, Watercolor, 15x10 inches.
Henry Roderick Newman (American, 1843-1917) admired Ruskin's writings and visited him in England. Newman liked to paint close-up views of flowers and plants in their natural setting. In this one, the textures gradate up to a delicate stippled tone at the top. The effect is quite different from what you would get with overlaid wet washes.

Painters used small overlaid strokes not only for grass-like textures, but for other textures as well. One of the strategies is to vary the color from one set of strokes to another. In this detail from a watercolor by William Trost Richards, the small strokes vary a bit from warm to cool, giving the surfaces some chromatic vibrancy.

Ruskin said, "The use of acquiring this habit of execution is that you may be able, when you begin to colour, to let one hue be seen in minute portions, gleaming between the touches of another." He advised his students to work slowly and delicately, using the point of the pencil or brush "as if you were drawing the down on a butterfly's wing."


Here's some real chopped straw as a point of reference. 

The look wasn't restricted to watercolor painters. Andrew Wyeth used a similar approach in some of his egg temperas. Aaron Draper Shattuck laid down a scrubby earth-toned underpainting in this detail of an oil painting, and then placed green strokes over it.
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I learned about this term from the book The New Path: Ruskin and the American Pre-Raphaelites
Related post: "Small Touches"

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Jean Lurçat (French, 1892 – 1966)  The Fabulous Bestiary,... [feedly]



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Jean Lurçat (French, 1892 – 1966)  The Fabulous Bestiary,...
// The Curve in the Line











Jean Lurçat (French, 1892 – 1966) 

The Fabulous Bestiary, 1948

Only 164 copies of this book of calligrams were published in 1948. Poems by Patrice de La Tour du Pin. 


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kafkasapartment: The Melancholy of Departure, 1916. Giorgio de... [feedly]



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kafkasapartment: The Melancholy of Departure, 1916. Giorgio de...
// The Curve in the Line



kafkasapartment:

The Melancholy of Departure, 1916. Giorgio de Chirico. Oil on canvas


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Autumn Landscape Demo with George Shipperley [feedly]



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Autumn Landscape Demo with George Shipperley
// Artist's Network

This demonstration is from "Familiar Sights That Never Were" by BJ Foreman in the July/August issue of The Artist's Magazine.

"Autumnal Tonalities" By George Shipperley

I base my landscapes upon years of observation of the natural world, but the particular scenes I depict come from my imagination. For the painting that would be Pathway, I saw in my mind a dense forest with a path going straight through.

1. Draw horizon line: Generally, when I paint a landscape, I establish a basis for the composition by first determining the horizon line. I did this in a dark color, ultramarine blue, and then added lines indicating a path.

tam_aug14_shipperley01

2. Mass shapes: Still using ultramarine blue, I began massing in the shapes. I used the same color for the sky, tree, and ground masses so I could establish an overall tonality.

tam_aug14_shipperley02

3. Add darks: I increased the darkness and density of the tree and ground masses, adding black to the ultramarine blue. This created a contrast with the sky and added depth to the trees. Many artists in other media avoid using black, but I find it very useful with oil pastels.

tam_aug14_shipperley03

4. Blend with medium: Here you can see that the linear markings in the sky, trees, and ground have begun to disappear because I rubbed those areas with a Scott paper shop towel moistened with Winsor & Newton Liquin Light Gel medium. This blending of the marks introduced more tonalities.

tam_aug14_shipperley04

5. Add trunks; subtract darks: I added the trunks and branches, which I thought of as directional compositional elements rather than as trees. I was working with an arrangement of negative and positive spaces as I established the more important, solid tree trunks. Besides drawing in the trees, I also rubbed out some of the dark mass with medium to give the appearance of light coming through the trees. In the image you see me blending the sky color and softening the edges of the trunks and branches with a shop towel. I also added some gray tones to the path.

tam_aug14_shipperley05

6. Begin foliage; harmonize colors: I then introduced the ochres and yellows, making this a fall scene. At this stage I was setting the overall pattern of foliage, taking the fall colors all the way to the ground, which established how much foliage I'd add and where I'd place it. This step also helped me determine where I would put the highlights and other tonal variations. Notice that I still let quite a bit of the blue sky show through. At this stage I also began adding browns to the trunks to make them more harmonious with the foliage.

tam_aug14_shipperley06

7. Add values: Applying stroke after stroke, I increased the sense of depth with additional color values—two or three different shades of the ochres and golds and yellows. At this point, much of the sky had disappeared, although I was careful not to cover all the blue; we see the sky through the trees, no matter how dense they are. I also began the tree shadows.

tam_aug14_shipperley07

8. Harmonize colors; soften edges: I continued to work with the foliage. I also made the ground color and trunks more harmonious with the colors of the forest and then blended the edges of the shadows, thus finishing Pathway (oil pastel, 20×23).

tam_aug14_shipperley08


In the midst of his 30-plus-year career in industrial sales, George Shipperley and his wife, Lois, opened the Henrich Art Gallery and Custom Frame Shop in Aurora, Illinois, which they ran successfully for 34 years before closing the operation in 2011. Shipperley wasn't able to focus on his own art until he retired from sales in 1994. He's taken classes at the Art Institute of Chicago and studied under Ruth Van Sickle Ford and Marianne Grunwald-Scoggin. He's the first artist to have been awarded signature membership in the Oil Pastel Society; he is an award-winner in The Artist's Magazine's 2011 Annual Art Competition and 2014 Over 60 Art Competition. He's also a 2014 inductee into Illinois's Fox Valley Arts Hall of Fame. Edgewood Orchard Galleries (Fish Creek, Wisconsin), Maggie Black gallery (Galena, Illinois), Proud Fox Gallery (Geneva, Illinois), and Artisan Gallery (Paoli, Wisconsin) represent his work. He also teaches classes and workshops. For more information, go to www.georgeshipperley.com, and be sure to order your copy of the July/August issue of The Artist's Magazine.


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70sscifiart: Richard Powers [feedly]



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70sscifiart: Richard Powers
// Hyperwave



70sscifiart:

Richard Powers


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drakontomalloi: Utagawa Kuniyoshi - Dragon above the Sea. N.d. [feedly]



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drakontomalloi: Utagawa Kuniyoshi - Dragon above the Sea. N.d.
// Hyperwave



drakontomalloi:

Utagawa Kuniyoshi - Dragon above the Sea. N.d.


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The Quietus | Features | In Extremis | Ritual Music For The Accumulation Of Energy: Anji Cheung Interviewed [feedly]



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The Quietus | Features | In Extremis | Ritual Music For The Accumulation Of Energy: Anji Cheung Interviewed
http://thequietus.com/articles/15920-anji-cheung-interview
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quincampoix: László Moholy-Nagy, Composition A XXI, 1925 [feedly]



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quincampoix: László Moholy-Nagy, Composition A XXI, 1925
// The Curve in the Line



quincampoix:

László Moholy-Nagy, Composition A XXI, 1925


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Assignment: Seasons composition

1. Find a color picture.
2. Draw the composition 4 times on a single sheet of paper, reducing the composition to it's simplest shapes.You will have to repeat the drawing 4 times so really do abstract the composition as much as possible.
3. Change and reinterpret the color from the original in each of the four drawings to match the 4 different seasons. Spring, summer, winter and fall.

Use your wet media. You can add a dry layer on top if it helps.

bagua colors - Google Search

https://www.google.com/search?q=bagua+colors&safe=off&client=safari&hl=en&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=7cfoU_vhJMa6oQTlmoCoBg&ved=0CAkQ_AUoAg&biw=1024&bih=648


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The Best Artist Guides for Mixing Colours

http://makingamark.squidoo.com/artists-color-mixing#module168471453


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Gurney Journey: Lightfastness and Alizarin Crimson

http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com/2010/04/lightfastness-and-alizarin-crimson.html


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Feng Shui Color

http://www.fengshui-tips.org/feng-shui-color.html


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