Wednesday, August 6, 2014

now-with-more-pulp/

http://amazingstoriesmag.com/2013/03/now-with-more-pulp/

Thomas Kinkade

Thomas Kinkade

Swatch assignment 8/4/14

Film Still Swatches:
Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory
Amelie
Apocalypse Now
Wizard of Oz
The Godfather
Star Trek

Music "Colors" Swatches
Rites of Spring
Minny the Moocher Cab Calloway
One note Samba 
Mozart the Magic Flute


Mood swatch assignment

Childe Hassam!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childe_Hassam

Stuff You Missed in History Class - How Michelangelo Worked

As a painter and a sculptor, Michelangelo became famous within his own lifetime. But who exactly was this artist, and what compelled him to create his masterpieces? Listen in as Katie and Sarah explore the life of Michelangelo in this podcast.

http://podcasts.howstuffworks.com/hsw/podcasts/symhc/2010-04-12-symhc-michelangelo.mp3

Stuff You Missed in History Class - Secret Science: Alchemy!

Many think of alchemy as a fool's pursuit, but alchemy has a rich history closely tied to medicine and metallurgy. Additionally, techniques developed by alchemists strongly influenced chemistry. So how come we don't call chemistry alchemy?

http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/podcasts.howstuffworks.com/hsw/podcasts/symhc/2011-10-24-symhc-alchemy.mp3

Stuff You Missed in History Class - How Vincent van Gogh Worked

Today, Vincent van Gogh has come to fit our idea of the tortured artist. Aside from his art, he's best known for cutting off his ear and committing suicide. Yet new research debates both of these van Gogh moments. Listen in to learn more about van Gogh.

http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/podcasts.howstuffworks.com/hsw/podcasts/symhc/2011-11-16-symhc-van-gogh.mp3

rainbow tree - Google Search

https://www.google.com/search?q=rainbow+tree&safe=off&client=safari&hl=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=aIHZU_XdA4aJogTugYGoCw&ved=0CDEQiR4&biw=320&bih=372#facrc=_&imgrc=i1WXxrc-RRbvuM%253A%3BLm1w4uV3AvO4CM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.dingtwist.com%252Fwp-content%252Fuploads%252F2013%252F06%252F25-Amazing-Trees1.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.dingtwist.com%252Famazing-trees%252F%3B1600%3B1220

lantern corps - Google Search

https://www.google.com/search?q=lantern+corps&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en&client=safari#facrc=_&imgrc=pFh8gSIdhm19qM%253A%3Bundefined%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fimageserver.moviepilot.com%252Fthe-lantern-corps-a-list-of-dos-and-don-ts-for-a-green-lantern-reboot.jpeg%253Fwidth%253D1280%2526height%253D720%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fmoviepilot.com%252Fposts%252F2014%252F02%252F17%252Fa-list-of-dos-and-don-ts-for-a-green-lantern-reboot-1241749%3B1280%3B720

Eye Candy for Today: Haseltine Venetian sunset [feedly]



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Eye Candy for Today: Haseltine Venetian sunset
// lines and colors

Santa Maria della Salute, Sunset; William Stanley Haseltine
Santa Maria della Salute, Sunset; William Stanley Haseltine

Beautifully Turneresque light in this view of Venice by American landscape painter William Stanley Haseltine. In the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

[Via @metmuseum]


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ooblium: Selected plates from the Theory of Colours by Johann... [feedly]



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ooblium: Selected plates from the Theory of Colours by Johann...
// The Curve in the Line

















ooblium:

Selected plates from the Theory of Colours by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1810

"Modern natural science sees darkness as a complete nothingness. According to this view, the light which streams into a dark space has no resistance from the darkness to overcome. Goethe pictures to himself that light and darkness relate to each other like the north and south pole of a magnet. The darkness can weaken the light in its working power. Conversely, the light can limit the energy of the darkness. In both cases color arises."

—Rudolf Steiner, 1897


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Can You Outgrow Your Art? [feedly]



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Can You Outgrow Your Art?
// Artist Daily

Train Tracks by Valerio D'Ospina, 2011, oil on melamined MDF, 30 x 24.
Train Tracks by Valerio D'Ospina, 2011, oil on melamined MDF, 30 x 24.

Some artists such as Jackson Pollock discover and use their own visual language to communicate with the world, and this singular voice takes them through an entire career of putting oil on canvas. Others—Picasso for instance—pass through several stages of change in their work, whether by theme, technique, or style.

Artist Valerio D'Ospina believes that his own artistic growth is in direct correlation with how he grows as a human being. "My personality, my character, and even my taste and style have been constantly changing throughout my entire life. Inevitably, my artistic needs are involved in this flow of changing," he says.

I identify with D'Ospina's point of view because I think—or hope—that I am constantly growing as a person, gaining wisdom and new abilities. And how can that not impact the art we make?

Just a few years ago, D'Ospina was a graduate student in Florence using a more traditional-classical approach to oil painting. The oil painting techniques that he used are for the indirect way of painting and included priming his linen with rabbit skin glue and gesso, toning his surface to a mid-tone value, making preparatory drawings and underpaintings, and using layers and glazes.

F. Galano in His Studio by Valerio D'Ospina, oil on canvas. Ragazza con tre oecchini by Valerio D'Ospina, oil on canvas.
The artist's early work:
F. Galano in His Studio

by Valerio D'Ospina, oil on canvas.
An early portrait:
Ragazza con Tre Oecchini

by Valerio D'Ospina, oil on canvas.
The approach dates back to the Renaissance but D'Ospina found that painting this way was driving him to photorealism because of its emphasis on refining technique and virtuosity. He knew it was time for a change when he realized that his first sketch of a painting rather than the end result with successive layers and rendering brought him more satisfaction. "The first sketch was faster, gestural, and more fresh. I thought it was a shame to cover all that with the heaviness of the defining layers," he says.

For D'Ospina, realizing he wasn't satisfied with the way he was working meant that he needed to disrupt the habits of his previous comfortable techniques by trying different surfaces, materials, and, most of all, by changing subject matter and experimenting with dramatically different themes. He also started painting alla prima, applying paint straight on the surface without using a pencil drawing sketch beforehand.

Now D'Ospina works on bringing a three-dimensional quality to the surface of his oil paintings and a sketchy rendering aspect to his compositions that still delivers a lot of meticulous detail. He also transitioned from painting more academic subjects to industrial scenes. All of this was uncomfortable for the artist at first, but it was exactly this challenge that led him to embrace a more expressionistic attitude and gave him the growth he needed to find continued satisfaction in his painting.

Naval Field (study) by Valerio D'Ospina, 2010, oil on melamined MDF, 31 x 24. Via Roma by Valerio D'Ospina, 2011, oil on melamined MDF, 18 x 12.
Naval Field (study) by Valerio D'Ospina,
2010, oil on melamined MDF, 31 x 24.

Via Roma by Valerio D'Ospina, 2011,
oil on melamined MDF, 18 x 12.
I'm incredibly inspired by D'Ospina's openness and his commitment to change his painting approach from what he first learned to what felt right to him as an artist. He was honest with himself about what he needed as an artist, and went after it. And that is what we should all do more of! If you want to explore the techniques that allowed D'Ospina to grow and refine his work, it is a great idea to start with Michael Wilcox's book on Glazing and other Old Master techniques. Enjoy!


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Pip and Pop’s Peculiarly Adorable Candy-Colored Worlds [feedly]



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Pip and Pop's Peculiarly Adorable Candy-Colored Worlds
// Brown Paper Bag

false

pip and pop pip and pop

These images are a bit of oldies, but are definitely goodies. I've seen some great miniature artworks lately (like the those by Kendal Murray), which reminded me of how much I enjoy Pip and Pop's  (aka Nicole Andrijevic and Tanya Schultz) tiny, candy-colored scenes.

The Australian duo uses things like sugar, sand, glitter, artificial plants, found objects, pipe cleaners, wire, beads and more in their site-specific installations. Of course, their massively miniature works look impressive from far away, but it's the details that I love. Small characters look as though they are traversing landscapes full of larger-than life flora and unidentifiable fungi. It's all strange, yes, but makes me wish I could explore these places in real life.

pipandpop14 pipandpop13 pipandpop12 pipandpop8pipandpop11pipandpop10 pipandpop6 pipandpop5 pipandpop4 pipandpop2 pipandpop1pipandpop3

 

The post Pip and Pop's Peculiarly Adorable Candy-Colored Worlds appeared first on Brown Paper Bag.


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Ficore on the Streets of Brazil [feedly]



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Ficore on the Streets of Brazil
// Wooster Collective

Brazilian street artist Ficore, working in graffiti since 1997, brings us this cool geometric mural on a housing complex in Vitória. 


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Mary Blair (American, 1911-1978) Concept Art for Peter Pan,... [feedly]



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Mary Blair (American, 1911-1978) Concept Art for Peter Pan,...
// The Curve in the Line







Mary Blair (American, 1911-1978)

Concept Art for Peter Pan, circa 1953

More


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mindblowingscience: See The World Through The Eyes Of A... [feedly]



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mindblowingscience: See The World Through The Eyes Of A...
// (ノ◥▶◀◤)ノ*:・゚✧









mindblowingscience:

See The World Through The Eyes Of A Cat

By Shaunacy Ferro Posted 10.15.2013 at 2:46 pm 

What does the world look like through a cat's eyes? The basic structure of feline eyes is pretty similar to what humans have, but cats' vision has adapted to very different purposes, so the world they see looks familiar, but isn't quite the same as ours. As predators, they need to be able to sense movement well in very low light. To make that work, they have to sacrifice some of the finer detail and color perception that humans have.

Artist Nickolay Lamm, who has previously brought us visualizations of urban heat islands and sea level rise projections, took a look at the world through kitty eyes for his latest project. Lamm consulted with ophthalmologists at the University of Pennsylvania's veterinary school and a few other animal eye specialists to create these visualizations comparing how cats see with how humans do. How we see things is represented on top; how a cat standing next to us would see the same scene appears below. 

Continue Reading.


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Greg Budwine [feedly]



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Greg Budwine
// lines and colors

Greg Budwine
Greg Budwine is an illustrator and painter from Texas, whose gallery paintings evoke a sense of contemplative stillness.

Working in acrylic, Budwine often chooses deceptively simple subjects, such as a single leaf, from which he constructs sophisticated statements. In many of his pieces, the presumably flat "background", rich with texture and vibrant color, is as much of an element in the composition as what first appears to be the subject. In many of these compositions the forms of shadows are also key elements in the whole.

[Via FASO Featured Artists]


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Frank Cadogan Cowper [feedly]



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Frank Cadogan Cowper
// lines and colors

Frank Cadogan Cowper, the last Pre-Raphaelite
British painter and illustrator Frank Cadogan Cowper was born a bit late to have been a Pre-Raphaelite painter, but like his contemporaries Henry Payne and Byam Shaw, he took to their style and subject matter so strongly as to be known as a Neo-Pre-Raphaelite (it that's not an inherently self-contradictory term).

Cowper's work fell into obscurity after his death in 1950s — in the middle of the dominance of the art world by the dictates of Modernism — but like many of the other Victorian and Edwardian painters who worked in similar artistic/literary traditions, his work again saw appreciation with the return to favor of those styles in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

Unfortunately, there is still not a great deal of his work available on the web. Though there are several sources listed below, you will find some redundancy among them.


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