Wednesday, July 30, 2014

links from class 7/30/14

https://kuler.adobe.com
frederic Remington Pastel Drawings
http://manvsart.com/ep-91-the-epic-history-of-the-color-blue/

Andrew Loomis' 5 c's

http://www.tigercolor.com/color-lab/color-theory/color-harmonies.htm

Henri Biva [feedly]



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Henri Biva
// lines and colors

Henri Biva, 19th century french lanscapes and florals
Henri Biva was a French painter of landscapes and floral subjects active in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Biva's naturalistic but somewhat romanticized landscapes often used a theatrical framing device, inherited from Claude Lorrain: dark foreground elements provide a kind of curtain, past which lighter passages beckon the viewer to enter the picture.

Sometimes Biva's use of this is a bit overt, to the point of being heavy-handed, but when it works, it works wonderfully. Combined with Biva's sense of light in woodland interiors, it makes the invitation to step into his paintings irresistible.

Unfortunately, in addition to the usual vagaries to which online art images are prone — shifted color, oversaturation and so on — a number of the available image for Biva's work are blurred or out of focus. I've attempted to color correct a few of the examples here.

There area few examples of his work available in high-resolution zoomable images from auction houses, listed below.


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Eye Candy for Today: N.C. Wyeth illustration [feedly]



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Eye Candy for Today: N.C. Wyeth illustration
// lines and colors

The Passing of Robin Hood, N.C. Wyeth
The Passing of Robin Hood, N.C. Wyeth

On Wikimedia Commons. If I'm reading the Brandywine River Museum's N.C. Wyeth Catalogue Raisonné correctly, the original is in the New York Public Library.

The illustration is from The Adventures of Robin Hood by Paul Cheswick and N.C. Wyeth. The full edition can be found used; but you can also get the Young Readers version from the Brandywine River Museum Shop, with the illustrations printed larger than in the original.

The entire book is available on Project Gutenberg, albeit with relatively small illustrations. Look for the illustrations on The Golden Age Site.

Wyeth's masterful control of light is what gives this moment its power.


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ooksaidthelibrarian: Sigismond Laskowski: Anatomie normale du... [feedly]



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Drawing Online Exclusive: Extended Interview with Jimmy Wright [feedly]



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Drawing Online Exclusive: Extended Interview with Jimmy Wright
// Artist's Network

The summer 2014 issue of Drawing is on sale (get your copy here, or subscribe to get every copy!), and it features an interview with Jimmy Wright (www.jimmywrightartist.com), whose dynamic paintings of sunflowers have made him one of the foremost pastel artists working today. Below are a few parts of our conversation that we couldn't fit into print, in which Wright discusses whether he considers pastel to be drawing or painting, his major influences, and using black.

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SF Grey Study No. 5, by Jimmy Wright, 2009, pastel, 25 x 17.

Drawing: Pastel is sometimes described as drawing, other times as painting. Do you consider it to be one or the other? Or does this distinction not even matter?

Jimmy Wright: This debate comes out of dealing with galleries and collectors who want to pay more for an oil painting than they'll pay for pastel. So some artists see this an important struggle, to make pastel equal to oil painting, but I find it to be a misplaced argument.

Art history shows us that the only time that pastel painting was equal to oil painting in financial and social status was in 18th-century France, when pastel portraits became the rage of French aristocracy and upper classes. A lot of that had to do, as always, with money and showing off. Not only were portraits incredibly beautiful, but they were glazed with very expensive flat glass and put in elaborate frames that were aesthetically gorgeous.

For me, I have a very simple attitude. My pastels are works on paper. I'm very careful with the type of frame that I select. I know that the more they look like a painting the more attractive they are to some collectors, but the reality is they're works on paper.

Classification of art has also changed with time. It used to be that art was compartmentalized by media, but that's no longer the case. A museum like MoMA or The Met may still have collections categorized by media, but contemporary collections are not categorized that way. So when The Met acquired one of my pastels, it was acquired not by the collection of drawings and prints but by the contemporary collection.

 

Sunflower on Blue Sky_ 29x41l2

Sunflower Blue Sky, by Jimmy Wright, 1995, pastel, 29 x 41.

DR: Were any teachers particularly influential or inspiring for you?

JW: One major influence was my very first drawing teacher, a sculptor named Tom Walsh. He's retired from university teaching and now lives in California. Tom taught me drawing for two years and later was a mentor when I was in graduate school.

The artist who had the most impact on me as a young artist was Ray Yoshida, who taught at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and is well known for being of great influence with the Chicago Imagists. Although I never adopted his formal solutions for making images, what he gave me was the confidence that a narrative can have a place in contemporary art.

 

DR: Many of your paintings have strong dashes of black, which contrast boldly with their surrounding colors. Can you discuss your use of black?

Gathering Together No. 5, by Jimmy Wright, 1998, pastel, 41 x 29.

JW: I see black as just another color. Right now my pastel palette is arranged by hue and value. If I were to pull out all the blacks—every variety by each individual brand—and line them all up in one container, you would find a huge range of what the color black is.

This is something I learned from Josef Albers. He never mixed color—that's an affinity I have with him. In pastel you never mix color or value; they're made in advance and you select them. With Albers, he might have had 12 different tubes of one color made by different manufacturers. Those different tubes became in a sense how paint was premixed for him. If he selected a color to interact with another, he wasn't mixing, he was finidng a manufactured color that worked within the framework of the painting. Pastel is very similar, and that's the way I use black. I just see it as another color, I think.

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Our thanks to Jimmy Wright for sharing his work and wisdom with us. To read the full-length interview, visit the North Light Shop to get summer Drawing.


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Monday, July 28, 2014

Links from class 7/28/14

https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20110808121624AA69KtD
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eT9vmpE8WcY
http://anaglyph-maker.en.softonic.com

Astroblog: Hand Drawn Anaglyphs!

http://astroblogger.blogspot.com/2008/12/hand-drawn-anaglyphs.html


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how anaglyph works - Google Search

https://www.google.com/search?q=how+anaglyph+works&safe=off&client=safari&hl=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=q57WU8B6hd6gBMG6gZAO&ved=0CCcQsAQ&biw=1024&bih=648


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Anaglyph 3D - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anaglyph_3D


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5 Secrets of People Who Follow Through with their Creative Aspirations [feedly]



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5 Secrets of People Who Follow Through with their Creative Aspirations
// Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement

self improvement tips

self improvement tips

"The starting point of all success is desire"

~Napoleon Hill

We are busy. Time flies. We have routines and habits that guide us through our days and to-do lists. However, there is another part of us that runs parallel to this experience. Next to our to-do list is another list that we keep close to our heart. This is the list of things we hope to someday accomplish. These are our soul projects, our creative projects. Maybe you want to someday,
  • Write a book.
  • Learn to paint.
  • Start a passion project.
  • Start a passion business.
Regardless of our busy, and often routine lives, we are all full of vibrant, creative inspiration. At times this inspiration is strong, and other times it feels distant. But it is always there. However, even though we have our creative instincts humming along in our core, they often get pushed aside: "I will start tomorrow." Tomorrow comes and goes. "I will actually start tomorrow." This turns into, "I will start when I have more time, or when things settle down." Time passes, days pass. The creative pull is left unanswered. When this happens we don't shine as brightly as we could, there is something that feels off, feels unlived, unloved. Luckily, the creative pull doesn't have to go unanswered. And we don't have to sacrifice what we are already doing to accomplish our creative aspirations. We can learn from the habits of people who are able to accomplish the regular demands of the day and still fit in their creative projects. 1) Take inventory of Why Creative Work is Important People who are able to get the creative projects done, understand why it is important for them to do so. They understand this not just on a practical level, but on a soulful level. For example, as a writer, I write because I feel better and more alive when I do so. I feel more present, with myself and with others. I believe that honoring our creative work can help make the world better place. I keep writing because I enjoy doing it, even on the days that it is a struggle. And ultimately I have never thought to myself after writing, "I wish I spent that time doing something else." We must find the reasons why the work is important and why it matters to us. Spend some time feeling into the creative pull. This sets the foundation for your work to flourish and come to form. 2) Prioritize Your Work, Manage Distractions We live in a world full of distractions, they are everywhere, extremely accessible, and promise instant gratification. However, one check of an email can turn into an hour lost to the Internet. The reason we are often easily distracted is because they have an illusion of only taking up a moment of time. So we don't put boundaries around our time engaging in distracting activities. Give yourself time to get lost in Facebook or in compulsively checking email. Put a container around it--give yourself set time to flow with distractions. Conversely, put boundaries on the time you will spend focused on your creative work. Make this work a priority. Remember the reason you are doing it. If setting boundaries around your time is a struggle, ask yourself if your current action is serving your highest creative good. Just this question can help you get back on track. 3) Take Consistent Action I read once that trying to exercise 3 days a week is much harder than 5 days. The reason being that when we engage in something regularly, we build momentum and habit. This is the same with following through with our creative aspirations. We must engage with our ideas and goals through regular action. Doing so creates space for us to have fun with the work, to feel what it is like to move through doubt, and come out the other side. Constant action helps us pick up energy and speed. Clarity comes from engagement. 4) Break Projects into Manageable Chunks If I were to look at my day and decide to start writing a book, I would instantly become excited but also overwhelmed. Feeling overwhelmed, insecure, or feel like I am biting off more than I can chew, is the perfect environment for stagnation, procrastination, and distraction to thrive. The trick to moving forward with our work is to make our goals small and manageable. When working in small chunks, we are still working towards our goal and making small steps towards completing it. For example, instead of saying, "I am going to start my book today," Say, "I am going to start to write by book by playing around with titles and jotting down thoughts about my first chapter." Phew, that feels better already. 5) Trust Your Instincts People who accomplish their creative goals, trust in their instincts. If you have the instinct to write, write. If you have the instinct to paint, paint. If you have the instinct to create a business, do it. Trust that these creative instincts are going to take you where you need to go. They will open doors, internally and externally, that are conducive to your personal and creative growth. Honor the soulfulness of creating something. And importantly, when you feel inspired, jump on the opportunity. Write on napkins, doodle, jot down ideas, get to work. The more we use our spontaneous creative muscles, the more confident we are in our creative selves. The more likely the our creative work will materialize gracefully into the world. Do you have a creative project you want to work on? Take the first step in materializing it by sharing in the comments below. Jackie Johansen, is a writer who combines personal development with actionable writing strategies. She is the creator of the Muse Activating audio meditation and the ebook, Is Writing a Struggle? How to Author the Words that Inspire the World. Get them free at FinallyWriting.com.  

The post 5 Secrets of People Who Follow Through with their Creative Aspirations appeared first on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement.


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Eye Candy for Today: Hanna Hirsch Pauli invites us for breakfast [feedly]



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Eye Candy for Today: Hanna Hirsch Pauli invites us for breakfast
// lines and colors

Breakfast-Time, Hanna Hirsch Pauli
Breakfast-Time, Hanna Hirsch Pauli

There is an often overlooked sub-genre of painting that I particularly enjoy; for lack of a better term, it might be called "outdoor still life".

I'm hard pressed to think of a better example than this stunningly beautiful painting of a 19th century breakfast table in a sun-dappled garden by Swedish artist Hanna Hirsch Pauli.

Richly painterly, with color that is at once understated and vibrant, it catches that magical difference of presenting still life subjects in the colors of sunlight.

The link is to Google Art Project. There is a high-resolution downloadable version of the file on Wikimedia Commons.

The original is in the Nationalmuseum, Sweden, but their version of the image seems over-saturated. I haven't seen the original, but my feeling is that this is one of those examples where the Google Art Project got the color right and the museum got it wrong.


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Music For The Eyes — Quick Step by Step [feedly]



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Music For The Eyes — Quick Step by Step
http://colours-theory.tumblr.com/post/92999939286/quick-step-by-step
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Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Good News and 10 Tips: This Drawing Medium Isn’t Just For Kids [feedly]



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Good News and 10 Tips: This Drawing Medium Isn't Just For Kids
// Artist's Network

There's nothing more inspiring to me than buying and opening up a brand new box of Crayola crayons! I think anyone with an ounce of artistic ability fondly remembers coloring as a child. Just the word coloring makes me happy!

Drawing with crayons (tree frog drawing)

This little guy was created in light color layers. It has such a soft look.

A few years ago, I wrote a book about realistic crayon drawing. What a joy it was to create, for I had brought my childhood dream into my adult professional life. I wanted to share it with others, for few knew that crayons are actually a wonderful fine art medium. They're not just for kids!
This week I've been teaching a class on how to draw animals. We covered mostly graphite and colored pencils, but one of my students wanted to draw with crayons. It was fun cracking open the box of Crayolas and giving the class a demonstration. I shared the illustrations I had done for the book, and we analyzed the characteristics of drawing with crayons.

I think the biggest problem people have when drawing with crayons is that they regress to being 5 years old again. They hold the crayon like they're coloring again, instead of applying it like a fine art medium. Another problem is that they want to make it perform like colored pencils. While similar in application, they are very different. Do NOT use crayons and expect them to behave like a colored pencil. You'll be setting yourself up for disappointment.

Many crayon artists (you can find a few online) use solvents to soften their appearance. It can be a wonderful look but, personally, I love the pixilated look the crayon creates when applied just as is. Look at these examplesyou can see the speckled look that crayon has when applied in layers. This adds to the realism, especially when creating an out-of-focus background like the examples here.

Drawing with crayons (butterfly drawing)

I love the way the soft background makes the butterfly and flower stand out!

If you want to try your hand at creating fine art with crayons, here are a few pointers:

1. Use Crayola. These are the best and have the best color saturation.
2. Use a paper that will grip the color evenly. I like Stonehenge or illustration board.
3. Have a good hand-held sharpener handy, and try to keep a point on the crayon. This makes it go on more evenly.
4. Apply the crayon in a professional manner, just like you would any other fine art tool. Use control and be deliberate. Don't turn 5 years old again!
5. Build your colors gradually, and layer them. Apply a light undertone, and build darker colors slowly on top.
6. Crayons can actually be more difficult to layer with due to the high wax content. Don't confuse them with colored pencils! If you want the "look" of colored pencil, just use that instead.
7. Some colors are more transparent than others. Some colors are very opaque. Test your colors on a separate piece of paper to see how they work together.
8. Too many layers of crayon can make the colors resist each other, making it harder to add more color. Use as few colors as possible to get your end result.
9. Scratch out small lines and details (such as hair, the veins in leaves and flowers, etc.) with a craft knife. Crayon is excellent for scratching due to the wax.
10. Do not get frustrated! You will need practice to get the look you want. It's worth it!

Happy coloring! Give yourself permission to play again. You may not think that working in crayon can produce a professional look, but you'll be pleasantly surprised. It's all in how you use them!

See you next time!
Lee


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Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Feng Zhu Videos

https://www.youtube.com/user/FZDSCHOOL

Krita Paint Program

https://krita.org/index.php

The Comic Company:
True Colors - Part 3

The Comic Company:</br>True Colors - Part 3

Coloring Comics

http://kleinletters.com/Blog/coloring-comics-old-school/

DeeSaturate: History of Comic Colouring: Part 1

DeeSaturate: History of Comic Colouring: Part 1: Let’s talk about old school colouring.  For 40 years color in the American comic industry used a simple, hand separated 4-colour (CMYK) syst...

Favorites

http://www.mpcfaculty.net/mary_nelson/facs/coursework/intd53/Lectures/week%206--color%20interactions.ppt


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Whatever Happened to Barry Windsor-Smith?

http://comicsalliance.com/whatever-happened-to-barry-windsor-smith-in-the-comics-conversation/

Monday, July 7, 2014

SKIN: a tutorial - Part 2 by navate on deviantART

http://navate.deviantart.com/art/SKIN-a-tutorial-Part-2-145159387

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-nate


SKIN: a tutorial - Part 1 by navate on deviantART

http://navate.deviantart.com/art/SKIN-a-tutorial-Part-1-144294636

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-nate


Philip Ball on The Chemistry of Painting

Check out this video on YouTube:

http://youtu.be/1mnrNibjFrQ


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Favorites

http://podcasts.tvo.org//bi/audio/BI_PhilipBall_031205.mp3


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http://michaellynnadams.com/zorn-palette/

http://michaellynnadams.com/zorn-palette/

Gurney Journey: Limited Palettes

Gurney Journey: Limited Palettes: Every Sunday I’ve been sharing some thoughts about color, and today I want to touch on limited palettes. When we were in grade school we all...

http://www.radiolab.org/story/211213-sky-isnt-blue/

http://www.radiolab.org/story/211213-sky-isnt-blue/

Differences of Pigment versus Dyes - Color Handbook - SpecialChem4Coatings

Differences of Pigment versus Dyes - Color Handbook - SpecialChem4Coatings