Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Still more “not the usual Van Goghs” [feedly]

  

----
Still more "not the usual Van Goghs"
// lines and colors

not the usual Van Goghs

Most of these can be found on WikiPaintings.

See my previous posts on the subject, below.


----

Shared via my feedly reader


Sent from my iPad

j-a-s-u: Sugar Aquarelle, here’s a very simple tutorial as I... [feedly]

  

----
j-a-s-u: Sugar Aquarelle, here's a very simple tutorial as I...
// Art and Reference point

















j-a-s-u:

Sugar Aquarelle, here's a very simple tutorial as I promised, hope it's helpful. ^u^


----

Shared via my feedly reader


Sent from my iPad

evergod: Self-Flagellants of the 14th century, detail,... [feedly]

  

----
evergod: Self-Flagellants of the 14th century, detail,...
// The Curve in the Line



evergod:

Self-Flagellants of the 14th century, detail, 1906

Pierre Grivolas (French, 1823-1906)


----

Shared via my feedly reader


Sent from my iPad

Eric Wert [feedly]

  

----
Eric Wert
// lines and colors

Eric WertWhen I first encountered the still life paintings of Eric Wert, I was struck by his use of color: vibrant and intense, yet controlled and always in the service of the composition.

I then was impressed with his handling of complex detailed compositions, often with multiple elements in front of intricate background patterns on wallpaper, wood or fabric.

The more I looked at his representation of natural forms, however, the more I was fascinated with his keen powers of observation, and fluid but precise rendering of his natural forms. Though there isn't a direct similarity of appearance, I was reminded of the intense accuracy of some of the Pre-Raphaelite painters, whose dedication to the truthful representation of nature resulted in plant and animal images that were accurate enough to be scientific illustrations.

On researching Wert, I found that he was, at one time, a scientific illustrator, and has put his obviously considerable skills in that regard in service of his gallery art.

Wert's approach to composition and painting style actually owe more to the Dutch still life painters than the English storytellers, but there also seems to be a narrative element to his work. His florals, for example, are rarely straightforward, but often involve vases tipped on their sides, contents spilled on the table, petals scattered — or even live plants removed from a pot and plopped down of a table in their ball of dirt.

As I continued to explore Wert's work, I was also impressed with his control of value, a skill made particularly clear in his graphite drawings (images above, second from bottom). I later found out, without surprise, that he begins his paintings with a grisaille and works his colors in layers of glazes.

There is a selection of drawings on Wert's website, along with galleries of recent paintings and archives. Fortunately, the images are large enough that you can at least get some idea of his approach. There is a single high-resolution image of the image above, top, on the ARC website, where it was a finalist in the still life category for the 2012-2013 ARC Salon.

There is a step-by step demonstration of Wert's oil painting techniques on the Artist's Network. There is also an article on Wert in the November 2012 issue of The Artist's Magazine.


----

Shared via my feedly reader


Sent from my iPad

Priscilla Wong [feedly]

  

----
Priscilla Wong
// lines and colors

Priscilla Wong, ETELOIS, Mr. Peabody and Sherman concept art and others
To be fair, I haven't see the new movie, Mr. Peabody and Sherman, but as a fan of the original Peabody's Improbable History animated shorts from the Rocky and his Friends TV series, I wouldn't be inclined to think of recasting the very 2-D, very limited animation series — in which writing and voice talent came to the fore — as just another in the string of incessantly jaunty, hyper-kinetic, 3-D CGI animated moves that we are currently barraged with these days.

The movie itself may well stand on its own as a piece of entertainment, but having seen the trailer, I can't help but wish the producers could have opted to leave the typical 3-D CGI look to other films, and cast the movie as a 2-D animation with the look of the concept art created for it by visual development artist Priscilla Wong (images above, top 7, ©Dreamworks Animation).

Wong's concept art not only has that wonderful springy, lively quality possible in drawings — and never quite realized in 3-D modeling, but her rendering is so lush and textural that I don't think audiences spoiled for 3-D would have been at all disappointed for a sense of completeness. Looking through her preparatory work for the movie, I kept picturing how the images might appear in motion, and thinking "Now, that would be a cool looking movie!"

Wong has an extensive article on her blog devoted to her visual development art for Peabody and Sherman, and there is also a selection of it on CGHub.

On Wong's website and blog you can also find more of her work for other projects, both personal and professional.

[Via CGHub]


----

Shared via my feedly reader


Sent from my iPad

Can three artists work simultaneously on one picture? [feedly]

  

----
Can three artists work simultaneously on one picture?
// Gurney Journey

This Australian street scene was painted on one giant piece of paper by three master watercolorists: Joseph Zbukvic, Alvaro Castagnet, and Herman Pekel, who call themselves The Three Caballeros The Three Amigos.


Fortunately the fun was captured on 24 minutes of mesmerizing video. (Direct link to video) They switch back and forth between big and little brushes, spritzers, and scrapers. They constantly trade places, with one guy diving into a wet area that another guy started. Their uproarious good humor and utter fearlessness is an inspiration to any painter.

Colourinyourlife
Books:
Zbukvic, Mastering Atmosphere & Mood in Watercolor
Castagnet, Watercolor Painting with Passion!
Video: My Vision in Watercolour DVD
Another great YouTube video showing J. Zbukvic painting a rainy street scene.
----

Shared via my feedly reader


Sent from my iPad

N. C. Wyeth ~ Robinson Crusoe 1920 [feedly]



Sent from my iPad

brucesterling: akihmbo: Woodblock prints of Hiroshi... [feedly]

  

----
brucesterling: akihmbo: Woodblock prints of Hiroshi...
// space in text





















brucesterling:

akihmbo:

Woodblock prints of Hiroshi Yoshida

*Man, ukiyo-e prints with a Western art-perspective look downright hallucinogenic


----

Shared via my feedly reader


Sent from my iPad

Easel-Mounted Diffuser [feedly]

  

----
Easel-Mounted Diffuser
// Gurney Journey


Getting the best light on your artwork while sketching outdoors makes a huge difference for seeing color. Ideally you want soft, diffused white sunlight at a level close to the brightness of the scene itself. The worst thing is cast shadows or dappled light across the painting. 

Controlling the light on your work can be difficult on a bright sunny day, which is why I came up with this easel-mounted diffuser. Unlike a white umbrella, this setup won't blow over in heavy wind. The diffuser affects the light only where you need it.

The white diffusing panel is made using a recycled Pendaflex frame. These rectangular aluminum supports were used for hanging file folders. Over the frame I stretched white rip-stop nylon and sewed a seam around the edge. The angle of the diffuser is completely adjustable and the whole thing is removable, held in by a wood bracket at the top of the easel.

Here's what it looks like on the side away from me. That bracket is a piece of plywood which is split so that it tightens against the aluminum bar. The wood bracket is held on with a Southco adjustable hinge, so that the whole bracket can fold down out of the way.

My homemade easel system can work for either sitting or standing height, because it mounts on a camera tripod. Here we were last week painting the old carriage house at the Wilderstein mansion here in the Hudson Valley. I'm painting contre-jour (facing the light), so the diffuser brings nice white light to my work surface.

And here's the painting I did. I was conscious of lightening and cooling the top edge of the building silhouette to make the sky feel bright and blue without actually painting the sky blue. It's an effect I've noticed from photography and I wanted to try it out on an observational painting.

I documented the whole thing on video, and I'll be releasing that segment as part of an upcoming DVD/download on plein-air watercolor.

If you make one of these diffusers, please send me photos of how you adapted the idea.
----

Shared via my feedly reader


Sent from my iPad

Arnold Böcklin (Swiss 1827 – 1901) The Sacred Wood,... [feedly]

  

----
Arnold Böcklin (Swiss 1827 – 1901) The Sacred Wood,...
// The Curve in the Line





Arnold Böcklin (Swiss 1827 – 1901)

  • The Sacred Wood, 1882
  • Self-portrait, 1872

----

Shared via my feedly reader


Sent from my iPad